All posts filed under: LA

March for Our Lives LA

This past Saturday millions of people marched all over the world to take a stand against gun violence and emphasize the urgency for common sense gun laws. I marched in Los Angeles with my boyfriend and thousands of others to say “Enough is Enough!” The streets of Los Angeles were filled with people from all ages and backgrounds, marching in solidarity. It was a beautiful sight to behold, and I was in awe of all of the young folks who were organizing against a system that has failed them. As adolescents they shouldn’t have to be putting in such difficult work, but I’m so grateful that they are. Check out some of the pictures I took at the Los Angeles march, be sure to follow and support these organizations, and vote! Everytown for Gun Safety Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America Giffords: Courage to Fight Gun Violence Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Complaining About LA Doesn’t Make You Cool

People complain to me about Los Angeles all the time. Mostly it’s grumpy folks who don’t live here, but sometimes it’s even those who have never stepped foot in the city. Everyone in LA is shallow! There are so many hipsters! The traffic is horrible! Everyone’s so snotty! There’s no culture! There’s no history! There are too many health nuts!  I wonder why friends, family, and acquaintances who live elsewhere feel the need to tell me how much they hate LA? Why they waste their time and energy whining about a place they barely know, to a person who openly loves calling Los Angeles home? There are folks who live here and can’t stand it because it’s not the right place for them, but some of them decide it’s objectively bad. LA’s too crowded, dirty, and pretentious…and I don’t fit in here because I’m different! These types of arguments seem to be based on a very narrow view of the city, ignited by ideas about what life’s like for predominantly white, upper-middle class people who live here. …

LA’s Women’s March 2018

This past weekend marked one year since the “You’re Fired” guy became the U.S. president. Sad! Very sad… Taking part in last year’s Women’s March in Los Angeles was an indescribable experience. I had been crushed by the election and inauguration, but witnessing the turnout that day gave me immense hope. An estimated 750,000 people shuffled around downtown LA, yelling, hugging, crying, laughing, and chanting. To share that experience with so many people – who cared and were scared too – made 1/21/2017 one of the most invigorating days of my life. This year’s Women’s March was nearly as exciting. In the wake of the #MeToo movement and the fight to protect DACA recipients and undocumented immigrants, the energy in the air was full of anger and determination. With a turn out of around 500,000 according to Mayor Eric Garcetti, LA proved once again that we are a city that shows up for all people. This is what democracy looks like, and this is what America looks like too. Below are a few pics I snapped during the march – …

My Guide to Vegan Food in Los Angeles

There are so so so so sooooo many vegan and vegan friendly restaurants in Los Angeles that I probably haven’t even been to most of them. Regardless, here are some of my favorite places to eat in LA that vegans and non-vegans alike would enjoy: 100% vegan restaurants: Shojin: This Japanese restaurant is expensive, but worth the price. Not only is the food spectacular (both beautifully plated and delicious), but the dining experience itself is truly one of a kind. (Little Tokyo – Downtown, Culver City) Sage: Sage is one of my favorite restaurants to take non-vegans who are open to trying vegan food, and where I eat most often with vegan friends and family. While they’re open for every meal of the day, Sage is my go-to spot for a healthy, filling brunch. (Echo Park, Culver City) My Vegan Gold: My oh my, do I love My Vegan Gold. This was one of the first 100% vegan restaurants I tried after moving to Los Angeles, and I keep going back again and again. I recommend their yellow curry …

WATCH: “Wearing the Big Heart”

When I started Catch-all one of my intentions was to share short films by artists who I felt had something unique and important to say. I haven’t posted any such work in a long time, and I think Wearing the Big Heart by Tony Carter-Hill is a great place to start again. Carter-Hill’s film captures the Los Angeles Women’s March, showcasing the march’s complex mood while revealing remarkably intimate moments within an intense and massive public event. That day meant something very special to me, and I appreciate how Wearing the Big Heart paints the historic Women’s March with such vibrant images and sounds. Carter-Hill’s work is abstract, dynamic, rhythmic, and truly compelling. I was able to ask Tony about what that day meant to him. Here’s a bit of what he had to say: “As people began to walk with their banners held erect and in these colorful costumes, I became more inspired about filming. I thought about reproducing a feeling rather than a narrative, while keeping in mind consciousness and place, national identity, humanistic tendencies, …

Visiting the Huntington

I’ve been meaning to visit The Huntington Library and Gardens in San Marino for over two years, and finally went with my sister recently. Below are photos we took in the various gardens, which span 120 acres and include a Desert Garden, Japanese Garden, and Chinese Garden, among others. The photos below do not do The Huntington justice, so I recommend spending the day there if you’re ever in the Los Angeles area. The Huntington Library was founded in 1919 by Southern California businessman Henry E. Huntington. Huntington had a deep interest in gardens, art, and books – building a massive research library, art collection, and botanical gardens. Only 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles, the Huntington Library is a wonderful place to relax and appreciate nature.

Riding the Pacific Surfliner

This past weekend I rode Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner from Los Angeles to San Diego & back. Here’s a diary entry-style post about my experience: From industrial neighborhoods to the ocean, journeying on Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner from Los Angeles to San Diego takes you through some of California’s distinct landscapes. Leaving from Union Station in downtown LA, the first views from the train are what I’d describe as hyper-industrial: cement trucks, train cars, wires, fences, and giant warehouses that are either overwhelmingly grey, or dotted with colorful graffiti. It’s dirt, metal, and cement for miles. The illicit art on buildings and walls – ranging from indecipherable messages to exceptional works of art – interrupt the monochromatic dominance of the landscape. Oddly enough, I think there’s something particularly beautiful about Los Angeles’ industrial and warehouse districts. The area isn’t at all glamorous, but the beauty is in its history and scope. Downtown LA is home to global industries and distribution centers. It’s where clothes are made and shipped internationally, and produce is organized and distributed across North America. Downtown is a hub …

PHOTOS: Women’s March Los Angeles

The Women’s March on Washington went global y’all (see: Pictures From Women’s Marches on Every Continent). And the Los Angeles sister march drew over 750,000 protestors – more than 10 times the number expected! Taking to the streets with a diverse community of progressive feminists (from all ages and walks of life) was an experience that meant so much to me. In spite of a dreadful Friday, and past year, the Women’s March served as a beam of light. There I saw hope in the form of thousands and thousands of people who are prepared to resist our frightening and repressive administration. We are the resistance. We will fight oppression and injustice together. In the words of Hillary Clinton’s campaign slogan, we’re stronger together. Oh, and love trumps hate! Here are some photos from the LA women’s march. Though they don’t capture the scope of the march or the shared sense of urgency permeating the air, I thought they were worth sharing:

4 Days Until the Inauguration

Happy Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day! Last year I compiled a few great MLK quotes, and I found that re-reading them today helped rile me up for the week ahead, the next four years, and beyond. The fact that this guy, of all people, is going to be our next president is still difficult for me to digest. I plan on spending the next few days thinking about what I can do in the future – what we can all do – to fight for a more just and compassionate community, country, and world. For the next week or so all of my posts will be related to the presidential inauguration and incoming administration. Tomorrow I’m sharing more about why this president and his cronies and fans scare me, followed by a resistance inspired reading list, online resources for getting involved and making a difference, and quotes from great activists and leaders that will hopefully empower you to stand in opposition to those who wish to oppress and control. This Friday I will be attending an anti-Inauguration rally, and …

VIDEO PROJECT: “Database as Artistic Form”

“Database as Artistic Form” is a video project that I completed this past spring for an interactive media course at USC. The project was inspired by Lev Manovich’s essay “Database as Cultural Form” and city symphonies of the 1920s such as Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera (1929) and Manhatta (Paul Strand & Charles Sheeler, 1921). For the project I created a database of video and sound clips which I then edited together by running three Java programs to determine the order and length of each clip. In his 1999 essay, “Database as Symbolic Form,” Lev Manovich argues that Man with a Movie Camera is possibly the clearest example of database filmmaking. He points specifically to a scene where Elizaveta Svilova, Vertov’s wife and the editor of the film, is seen examining and organizing strips of celluloid. In this especially self-reflexive moment, Svilova is essentially working with a material database. For my video project I was interested in a digitally mediated take on Svilova’s database, where I would compile a catalogue of sound and video clips, which would …