All posts filed under: Nostalgia

Final Thoughts Before the Return of “Twin Peaks”

Tonight’s the night! After re-watching Fire Walk With Me I have some final thoughts I wanted to put out there before the series premiere. *SPOILERS AHEAD* ON NOSTALGIA I’ve certainly been critical of “nostalgia-TV” in the past (see my post on Fuller House), and am particularly weary of 90’s specific reboots and revivals – but unlike other shows, the Twin Peaks return doesn’t bother me. Is my love for the show somewhat nostalgic? Yes, absolutely. Is its newfound popularity since it began streaming on Netflix at least slightly indebted to the grips of nostalgia? Surely. But more than that, Twin Peaks‘ adoration and acclaim should be credited to the fact that it was, and still is, an extremely well crafted, unique, intelligent, and inventive series that changed the televisual landscape forever. Based on how the original series ended and what I’ve gleaned from interviews, I imagine that the revival will pick up with “good Cooper” still stuck in the Black Lodge 25+ years later, trying to get out. Simply seeing the characters/actors return 26 years after the final episode is a return to the same, but I imagine that …

It Is Happening Again: “Twin Peaks” is Almost Back

After over 25 years, Twin Peaks is returning to television on Sunday, May 21st and I am so, so excited! Incase you don’t follow me on Twitter and see my annoyingly obsessive tweets, Twin Peaks is pretty much my favorite show of all time. I’m not an OG fan because I wasn’t even born until 1991, so I couldn’t watch it in its first run, but thanks to Netflix I discovered the series shortly after graduating from film school. As an undergraduate I took a television class in which my teacher lectured passionately about how important and revolutionary Twin Peaks was for TV, and it stuck with me. So once I realized it was on Netflix, I decided to give the series a shot and was absolutely floored by the first episode; immediately captured by its unique atmosphere. Twin Peaks is campy fun, but also terrifying. It’s surreal, yet frighteningly close to reality. It’s sometimes lighthearted, though often horrific and dark. Each episode catapulted me through a series of emotions from start to finish. It captured my attention in a way that no other show has, or I presume ever will. I …

Revisiting My Undergraduate Thesis Film

As I enter my last year of graduate school, I’ve found myself reflecting on my undergraduate years, almost longing for that simpler time. I’m only 25, yet I’ve been feeling far older, like my age is a scary number that keeps getting larger and larger and more overwhelming. But that’s a different story – one that I may return to in a separate post. This sentimental reflection on my past has led me to revisit some of my older work, such as my senior thesis film, Fruition. So much has changed since I started making Fruition in 2012, and although I haven’t made a notable short film since, I know that my perspective as a creator has evolved significantly. On the one hand, I’m not as naive and am instead somewhat disillusioned and overwhelmed by how little I understand about life itself. On the other hand, I feel more empowered and able to embrace who I am and my unique perspective. I know that I’m somewhat smarter and more equipped to understand others and the world around me. That being …

20 Facts on the 20th Anniversary of ‘Toy Story’

Toy Story was released on November 22, 1995, when I was only four years old. As much as my childhood memories are already beginning to fade, I’ll never forget what it felt like to see Toy Story as a child. The fun, the adventure, and the joy of witnessing toys come to life and conquer their own fears – it was magical, and in many ways, still is. As the company’s first feature-length film, Toy Story signaled the beginning of a generation of Pixar classics. In honor of Toy Story‘s 20th anniversary, here are 20 fun facts! 1. Toy Story was directed by John Lasseter. 2. It was the highest grossing film of 1995. 3. Woody and Buzz Lightyear were inspired by toys that Lasseter had as a child. 4. Billy Crystal was offered the role of Buzz Lightyear, but turned it down. After seeing the completed film, he claimed that it was the biggest mistake of his entire career. 5. The character of Sid is supposedly inspired by a former Pixar employee who would take apart toys and then reassemble them into strange creations. 6. The carpet in …

My High School Playlist

After perusing my iTunes library, which I honestly haven’t used much since high school, I was instantly hit with an intense wave of nostalgia. Music played a humongous role in my high school experience, whether I was going to concerts, making mix-CDs for friends, or brushing up on my crush’s favorite bands. All of the songs I listed in this playlist take me back to that awkward, exciting time. Here’s my ultimate high school playlist: What songs make you nostalgic?

My Favorite TV Intros of All Time

In no specific order, here are a few of my favorite TV intros of all time. Be sure to share some of your favorites in the comment section below! Freaks and Geeks If you haven’t seen Freaks and Geeks yet, I advise you do so, because it’s a spectacularly fun show. How the hell did it only last one season? Anyways, this intro is great because it succinctly introduces each of the main characters to the audience, and shares a little bit about them based on how they react to the experience. The music is awesome, the premise is great, and above all, James Franco’s moment is magical. Portlandia No TV show intro makes me happier than Portlandia‘s. Prior to watching Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein’s series I had been a fan of Washed Out for a while, so when I first watched the show and heard “Feel it All Around” as the featured theme, I was ecstatic. I’ve only spent a couple of days in Portland, but from what I remember, Portlandia‘s intro captures the essence of the city perfectly. House of Cards …

‘Twin Peaks’ Is Returning

Twin Peaks first premiered on ABC in 1990, just a year before I was born. Nearly two decades later, during film school, one of my professors gave a lecture on the series and how it impacted network TV. I was intrigued. Once it became available on Netflix I decided to take the plunge and what I discovered was both wildly strange and completely magical. David Lynch and Mark Frost’s creation was unique, fascinating, and ahead of its time. For me, Twin Peaks embodied the oddness of life with its own bizarre Lynchian twist. Much like Blue Velvet, the series presented a small town that looked quaint and perfect on the outside, but once its facade was peeled back its dark and menacing interior was exposed. Last night I finished season two of Twin Peaks and was immediately disappointed that there wasn’t more. Because the season finale wasn’t written to be a series finale (it was unexpectedly cancelled prior to season 3), so many questions were left unanswered, and goodness I wanted more. But in an unusual turn of events, I woke up this morning to see …