All posts filed under: Thoughts

LA’s Women’s March 2018

This past weekend marked one year since the “You’re Fired” guy became the U.S. president. Sad! Very sad… Taking part in last year’s Women’s March in Los Angeles was an indescribable experience. I had been crushed by the election and inauguration, but witnessing the turnout that day gave me immense hope. An estimated 750,000 people shuffled around downtown LA, yelling, hugging, crying, laughing, and chanting. To share that experience with so many people – who cared and were scared too – made 1/21/2017 one of the most invigorating days of my life. This year’s Women’s March was nearly as exciting. In the wake of the #MeToo movement and the fight to protect DACA recipients and undocumented immigrants, the energy in the air was full of anger and determination. With a turn out of around 500,000 according to Mayor Eric Garcetti, LA proved once again that we are a city that shows up for all people. This is what democracy looks like, and this is what America looks like too. Below are a few pics I snapped during the march – …

I’m Still Mad That “Good Girls Revolt” Was Cancelled

It’s been a little over a year since the premiere of Good Girl’s Revolt on Amazon, and a little over a year since its cancellation. The stellar series was created by Dana Calvo and is based on journalist Lynn Povich’s memoir of the same title. In her memoir, Povich details the discrimination lawsuit women at Newsweek launched against the publication in 1970. When I started Good Girls Revolt in November of 2016 (it premiered 10/28/16), Hillary Clinton had just lost the election. I was in absolute shock, punched in the gut by the reality that this country elected a racist idiot who jokes about sexual assault instead of a well qualified woman. I still have a difficult time facing the meaning behind her loss – and his win – and all that it says about this country and the people who inhabit it. At that time Good Girls Revolt offered a reprieve. It was a show created by women, for women, and I felt that energy in every ounce of its being. In early December of 2016, just a little over …

Catch-all in 2018

I decided against making resolutions this year, but that doesn’t mean that I shouldn’t put aside a little time to reflect on Catch-all and consider what the future of this blog should – or could – look like. Because blogging is just a hobby for me, I’ve never been particularly strict about narrowing down my focus (it’s called Catch-all for a reason) and I know that going into 2018 my posts will continue to be just as varied. I do, however, plan to put my media studies degree to use and share more work that examines film, TV, pop culture, music, politics, identity, and representation. With more serious work will also come some fun (I think it’s about time to write about Vanderpump Rules) and I’m hoping to maintain that delicate balance between content that reflects both fierce critical engagement, and lighthearted entertainment. Catch-all in 2017 Most popular posts this past year: Fun with Vinyl Resistance Reading List On America, Mobility, & Freedom in “Easy Rider” PHOTOS: Women’s March Los Angeles Riding the Pacific Surfliner Most …

Tommy Wiseau, Vegan Pizza, & Gifs

I really enjoyed putting together this casual newsletter-style post back in June, so I thought I’d do another! Here’s what I’ve been watching, listening to, reading, thinking about, doing, eating, and fawning over. What have you been into lately? WATCHING Not to be dramatic, but I’ve been so busy lately that I haven’t had time to watch much TV or go to the movies. As far as television goes I’m currently watching Stranger Things, Transparent, Golden Girls, X-Files, Master of None, and Star Trek: The Next Generation. I’m basically part-way through all of these shows but haven’t been watching consistently. But I did binge the past 10 episodes of I Love You America with Sarah Silverman on Hulu the other night and I LOVE IT — YOU SHOULD WATCH! This past week I saw Star Wars: The Last Jedi and attended the 30th anniversary screening of Die Hard. The movies I plan on FINALLY watching this week include Lady Bird, The Florida Project, and The Disaster Artist, and I’m hoping to see Call Me By Your Name, Lemon, and Lucky soon. Oh can we talk about The Disaster Artist trailer for a …

Saving Net Neutrality

UPDATE: The FCC has voted 3-2 to repeal Net Neutrality, but there’s still hope! Congress can pass a “Resolution of Disproval” in order to overturn the FCC vote. Continue to write, Tweet, and call Congress using battleforthenet.com. This week I wanted to share a post on how the internet has democratized creativity, serving as a space for all to create and disseminate art and ideas. But then I remembered the fast approaching vote on net neutrality, which impacts the very existence of a free and democratic internet. In the U.S., internet is a public service, accessible to all. In 2016 a federal court ruled that internet access should be classified as a utility, not a luxury, and that as a result government regulation is vital in maintaining a balanced dynamic between users and providers. “The decision affirmed the government’s view that broadband is as essential as the phone and power and should be available to all Americans, rather than a luxury that does not need close government supervision.” – “Court Backs Rules Treating Internet as Utility, Not …

Lena Dunham’s Rich White Kids

I haven’t had the time to blog lately, so I wanted to jump back into things with a super short post on Lena Dunham. This is just something I wrote on my notes app one night last week, so my thoughts aren’t fully fleshed out, nor are they particularly well assembled. I was thinking a lot about Lena Dunham after she defended an accused rapist and had one of her Lenny Letter writers quit, citing “hipster racism.” Dunham has been doing and saying problematic things for years, and although I really wanted to be a fan (she’s an outspoken writer/director/producer and I look up to that) her work has consistently rubbed me the wrong way. One of the things that has always made Lena Dunham’s work a bit difficult for me to digest (beginning with Tiny Furniture, even though I enjoyed it overall) is that her very wealthy artist New Yorker background is so much a part of her storytelling. Her film, TV series, and writing is always about white girls, but specifically elitist, posh, rich white girls, which is …

Giving for Thanksgiving

Usually my Thanksgiving posts involve writing about what I’m thankful for or highlighting the hypocrisy of the holiday, but this year (oh what a year it’s been…) I decided to create a list of charities and groups worth donating to. Because what’s better than giving on Thanksgiving? Like any list I’ve made on Catch-all, this post is wholly incomplete. There are so many wonderful charities that have either slipped my mind, or I’m not aware of yet, so please be sure to share some of your favorites that aren’t listed in the comment section below. And whether you’re celebrating Thanksgiving or not, I hope you enjoy the holiday season and spending time with loved ones. ❤ Farm Sanctuary The ACLU EMILY’s List The Downtown Women’s Center of Los Angeles National Park Foundation NARAL The Trevor Project Habitat for Humanity The Children’s Defense Fund Best Friends Animal Society National Center for Transgender Equality Amnesty International National Lawyers Guild Women in Film “Unidos” Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief – The Hispanic Federation Stand Up To Cancer NAACP Legal Defense …

My Makeup Dilemma

Like many women, I have a somewhat complicated relationship with makeup. Applying cosmetics and experimenting with new products, shades, and styles is an opportunity to express myself creatively, and wearing it makes me feel good about myself. But once I start to peel back the label on the norm, so-to-speak, I remember what a problematic concept makeup is. At a certain age, women are expected to cover their flaws. We’re taught to wear makeup; just enough, but not too much. Too little and you look tired and lazy – too much and you’re “fake.” Some men complain of “false advertisement” when a woman wears so much makeup that her appearance is significantly altered, but the same men expect women to naturally look like living, breathing, Barbie dolls. Beauty is a multi-billion dollar business in the U.S., and the industry is so lucrative because many of us feel that our beauty is our worth. In America, and presumably much of the world, women who occupy professional roles are not necessarily required to wear makeup, but it’s certainly expected of them. It’s been proven …

How YouTube & Instagram Are Normalizing the Vegan Lifestyle

  This post is a slightly tweaked version of a paper I presented as part of the Political and Social Subtexts of Food panel at the 2017 National Pop Culture & American Culture Conference in San Diego. ———– Thanks in part to social media, being vegan in America has become more acceptable and even “cool” in some circles. But more importantly, digital vegan activists have made veganism approachable for many of those who may not have access to the movement otherwise. YouTube and Instagram, in particular, seem to be platforms in which vegan content creators can work to normalize the lifestyle, while simultaneously creating a digital social community where vegans can find the support and resources they need to sustain their lifestyle decisions. Based on current food industry trends, the U.S. vegan population appears to be on the rise, though the exact increase is difficult to gauge since recent reliable data isn’t available. But with major ice cream companies such as Ben & Jerry’s and Dreyer’s now offering dairy free flavors, and a wheat, coconut …

There’s No Place Like Home

As I captioned the above photo on Instagram, things are always changing in Tucson, but also remaining exactly the same. I spent 24 years of my life living in the same city. I was born there, went to school there, fell in love there, made friends there, lost friends there, had loved ones be born there and die there. And when I moved away I had no idea what it would feel like to come back home. When I’m in Tucson I’m bombarded by familiar smells, sounds, and feelings. The air is different, the stars shine brighter, the birds chirp louder. In the summer there’s the smell of creosote and the sound of cicadas. The fall starts off warm, but a coolness eventually rolls in. The winters are chilly and dark and there’s something wonderful about feeling cold in the desert. In the spring the Texas Rangers bloom with bright purple flowers and the smell of sunscreen fills the air as people flock outside before it gets too hot again. While I wouldn’t trade living in …