All posts filed under: Travel

Snapshots from Coronado Island

A few weekends ago I had the chance to visit Coronado Island, just across the water from San Diego, CA. While I intended to get some work done while I was there, it was practically impossible with the near perfect weather and pacific waves calling out to me: just relax…relax…seriously dude, you need to chill… So I ended up getting about 10% of the work done that I needed to, but that’s what happens when you’re near a beach and the type of person who easily puts things off, right? Oh yeah…I have some time on Monday to finish that…I think… I took a day-trip to Coronado a few years ago, but this was the first time I really had the opportunity to check the place out. My boyfriend’s family was in town and kind enough to invite us down, so we explored the island for a few days with them. We ate breakfast at Clayton’s Coffee Shop, a 50’s diner that genuinely feels like a 50’s diner, walked along Dog Beach, and spent plenty of time strolling around the glorious Hotel del Coronado, …

Keep Portland Weird!

During a recent trip to Portland, OR, I spotted the “Keep Portland Weird” mural I recognized from Portlandia, and I was pretty excited (though not excited enough to get a picture, oops!). But is it even possible for Portland not to be weird? Weirdness is in the air, the water, the food, the sounds, the streets, the businesses, the citizens. Weirdness is an intrinsic part of the city’s identity. Portland is weird and weird is Portland. Let me take a moment to say that my concept of “weird” is essentially “cool.” Portland isn’t weird in an uncomfortable, eerie way – Portland is weird in an uncompromisingly humble, kind, welcoming, and unapologetically unique type-of-way. I had briefly been to Portland once before, but for some reason, I wasn’t hit as hard with the weird-cool vibes as I was on this most recent trip. Oh, and Portlanders are unbelievably nice too! Below are a few pictures that I snapped during my trip, most of which are from Washington Park’s International Rose Test Garden and the Portland Japanese Garden. Not pictured is all the great vegan food I ate (besides …

A Day in Santa Barbara, CA

A few weekends ago I took a day trip with my boyfriend to Santa Barbara, CA, just 80 minutes north of Los Angeles. This was my first time in Santa Barbara, and even though it was just a day, I can say that the small city exceeded my expectations. I knew it would be beautiful, but I was admittedly surprised by Santa Barbara’s lack of pretension. Our first stop was the Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a stunning Spanish Colonial Revival-style building completed in 1929. Before checking out the rest of the city we got brunch at Mesa Verde, a cute vegetarian restaurant where the food is light and flavorful, and the plating is impeccable (I think flowers may come on every plate!). While in Santa Barbara we also stopped by Stearns Wharf, made our way down State Street, went to Old Mission Santa Barbara (where there happened to be a chalk drawing exhibit), and ended our day at Butterfly Beach, which was foggy and cold in the best kind of way. If you’re in the Los Angeles area and want to get away …

Bisbee & Tombstone, AZ

Two weeks ago I was in Tucson visiting friends and family, and I took take a day-trip with my sister and headed south to Bisbee, AZ. Bisbee is an old copper mining town that is known for its art, antiques, and eccentricity. And on our way back to Tucson we briefly stopped in Tombstone, the location of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. If you’re ever in Tucson, Bisbee is just a 1.5 hour drive south, and on the way to Bisbee you can check out Tombstone for a walk around an authentic Western town. Bisbee is best experienced over a couple of days, but if one is all you’ve got, it’s still worth the trip. Be sure to check out Discover Bisbee Arizona and Tombstone’s informational website.

Barrio Viejo, Tucson

Last weekend I was searching through my computer and rediscovered these photos I took in Tucson just a little over a year ago. Before moving to Los Angeles, I tried to visit places throughout town that were important to me or that I felt retained a deep connection to the city’s spirit. Barrio Viejo, a neighborhood in downtown Tucson, is one of those places. According to Barrio Viejo’s website, the neighborhood is considered to be the largest collection of 19th century adobe buildings in the United States. In addition to its history, Barrio Viejo’s character and charm is what draws me to the area; each street is brimming with color and energy. It’s also a place where community, family, and supporting local commerce is of the utmost importance. If you ever find yourself in Tucson, I recommend parking in the neighborhood and going for a stroll. And after that, you can discover the rest of what Tucson’s eclectic downtown has to offer.

A Day at Joshua Tree National Park

During the summer before my junior year of college I saved up to buy my very own camera. Other than my childhood Polaroid and a few disposables here and there, I never had one of my own. I was set on getting a fancy DSLR, so once I had worked enough hours at a sandwich joint and an architecture office, I dove into the investment. Although I’ve never learned how to properly utilize all of my camera’s capabilities (I’ve decided to finally try to master it this year) it has gone with me on quite a few adventures. From France and Italy, to Los Angeles and San Francisco, my camera has captured beautiful people, places, and things, and I’m so thankful to have it. This past weekend I journeyed to Joshua Tree National Park with my boyfriend, his parents, and my trusty camera. Joshua Tree straddles the Colorado and Mojave deserts in southern California, just outside of the Coachella Valley. The park features spectacular rock formations and strangely beautiful Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), a plant that is part of the agave family. According to legend, the …

A Weekend in San Francisco

I spent last weekend in San Francisco with my boyfriend and wow, did we have a blast! It was my first time in the city and I already knew I’d love it before arriving, but San Francisco somehow exceeded my expectations. During our brief visit we checked out a few excellent vegan restaurants including Shizen and Golden Era, both of which would be enjoyed by vegans and meat-eaters alike. We hit up most of San Francisco’s iconic areas including Union Square, Fisherman’s Wharf, Chinatown, the Mission District, Haight-Ashbury, and of course the Golden Gate Bridge. Unfortunately we missed out on the Castro District, but that just means we have something already planned for next time. We also explored Golden Gate Park, took a few snap shots of the “Painted ladies” (or “Full House houses,” as I like to call them), and drove to the top of Twin Peaks road for a spectacular view of the city. On our last day we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and spent a little time in the beautiful town of Sausalito, and then we headed back home to Los Angeles. Now that I don’t live too far …

Revisiting My First Blog: Girl in Cannes

I recently rediscovered my first blog from almost three years ago, Girl in Cannes, and thought it would be fun to share it on Catch-all. I started Girl in Cannes as part of a scholarship project in conjunction with my college internship at the Cannes Film Festival in 2012. It’s a lot to read, but be sure to check out some of the pictures I snapped in Italy after my internship concluded. I took this photo today at my aunt and uncle’s house in Phoenix. How beautiful! I thought it would be nice to post a picture from Arizona before I depart for Europe. I’m truly going to miss Tucson (not the heat, but my family and friends), but I am OVERWHELMED with excitement. I’ll be particularly happy once I get off the plane, because I am not looking forward to the long flight! I board in 10 minutes, so it’s time for me to say au revoir to America and bonjour to Europe! _______________________ _______________________ I’ve been extremely busy and have had very limited internet access, so …

Road Trippin’ on a Budget

Today my sister and I will embark on an eight-hour drive to sunny Los Angeles. Although I’ve been on dozens of road trips, this will be the first time she and I will be heading out on our own. Just two gals, a few mix CDs, and a car. And because yesterday was my last day at my Tucson job and I have yet to start my LA job search, I’m feeling especially free. For the first time in my life I’m not sure when I’m returning home, and it’s kind of exhilarating. Because I enjoy traveling, but have an extremely tight budget to work with, I thought I’d share some of my tips. Please be sure to share any additional travel suggestions you have by commenting below! → Make sure your vehicle is in tip-top condition before hitting the road. Remember, anything that can go wrong will. I was once on a trip where our tire blew out and we were delayed by six hours. Shit happens, but you can do your best to ensure that certain problems will …

Buffalo, NY – Beyond The Reputation

A few weeks ago I visited Buffalo, NY for a family wedding, pre-snowpocalypes. My mother is from Kenmore, a suburb of Buffalo, so I have visited the city just under a dozen times in my life. This trip, however, was my first time vacationing during the fall, so I was delighted to experience a true autumn. In Tucson there are basically two seasons – summer and winter – so to see streets lined by brightly colored trees and to be able to crunch through piles of leaves on the ground was a wonderful new experience. Though quite beautiful, Buffalo is similar to Detroit or Baltimore in that it has a fairly bad reputation. When I tell people who have never been that I’m visiting, they sometimes ask “Why are you going there? Isn’t it shitty?” But that couldn’t be further from the truth. Buffalo has a spectacular history. After the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, it quickly grew to become an economic hub of the northeast. The city’s impressive past is reflected in its architecture that includes buildings designed …