All posts tagged: Comedy

10 Film & TV Costumes for Halloween

I wrote this blog post last Halloween, but since I haven’t had the chance to come up with more ideas for film & TV-inspired costumes, I decided to repost it. This year my boyfriend and I are getting nostalgic AF and dressing up as Forrest Gump and Jenny for Halloween—who are you dressing up as?! 🎃👻🧡 … Over the years Halloween has evolved into one of my favorite times of year. I’m not the type of person who engages in fan communities and does cosplay, but I find so much joy in figuring out a costume and putting it together. Basically, Halloween preparation is a form of self-care for me – as I’m sure it is for most folks who enjoy this time of year. Even if I don’t have solid plans, I know that I’m going to assemble a costume and wear it somewhere, anywhere, simply because it’s fun and makes me happy. Below are 10 film and TV-related costume ideas that I was inspired by. Some are relevant, others not so much, but they’re all fun …

A Few of My Favorite 80’s Movies

Oh the 80’s. It was the decade that came and left just before I was born and bestowed us with vibrant clothes, pop music, and Reagan’s regressive policies. It’s the time that my mom refers to mysteriously and with an air of disdain, telling a curious story from her past and concluding with a sigh, “well it was the 80’s.” And when I watch popular American 80’s movies, I think I catch her drift. Below are five of my favorite off-beat, magical, bizarre, and hilarious movies that are quintessentially of the 80’s. What are a few of yours? Raising Arizona (dir. Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, 1987) Raising Arizona is my favorite Coen brother’s film (followed closely by The Big Lebowski) and a Nic Cage favorite as well. Raising Arizona is charming, hilarious, well written, and perfectly cast and performed. The film’s very particular production design, cinematography, and soundtrack also adds to its magic. And as an Arizonan, I seem to have a warm place in my heart for any movie that takes place there.   The Breakfast Club (dir. John Hughes, 1985) Like …

Reflections on “Emerson”

It’s my last week of classes at USC before I graduate, which basically means it’s my final week of school ever since I definitely don’t plan on getting my PhD! WOOT. I’m feeling a mix of emotions, but I’m mainly excited. Graduate school has made me a better, smarter person, but I’m certainly ready for the next, non-academic chapter in my life. I never really was a procrastinator before grad school, but these past two years I’ve spent plenty of late nights getting work done at the very last-minute. As someone with a fine arts degree, I think it’s because writing non-stop scholarly work is too strenuous for me. I need to take breaks and make stuff, beyond shaping flowery words into poignant statements on cinema, TV, and culture. I don’t consider myself an artist by any means, but I like working with my hands – putting pictures into thrifted frames, moving furniture, making photo collages – and research and academic writing, as much as I enjoy it, doesn’t satisfy those needs. But making short films does, and I …

“Little Miss Sunshine” Turns 10

Little Miss Sunshine was released 10 years ago today, on July 26, 2006. Though a decade old, the film still resonates as a dark comedy about the complications of life at any age. Little Miss Sunshine seems to pinpoint, especially, the fact that going on a trip with your dysfunctional family can actually be therapeutic. As a film it’s funny, sad, and delightfully honest – much like life itself. I recently posted about six of my favorite road trip films, and of course Little Miss Sunshine made the list! So be sure to check out that post if you want to read a little more about why I love this film. Otherwise, to celebrate its 10th anniversary, here are a few stills from Little Miss Sunshine:

Remembering Robin Williams

Today marks the one year anniversary of Robin William’s death, an utter and complete tragedy. Despite never knowing Williams personally, through his performances and interviews I felt like I was given a piece of his brilliant spirit. We all were. Whether comedic or dramatic, his performances always felt deeply entwined with his quick creative spark and remarkable intelligence. It’s truly astonishing just how many lives Robin Williams touched. He is greatly missed, and will be remembered forever as a great American icon. In memory of Robin Williams’ expansive career and beautiful soul, here are stills from some of his greatest performances.

Celebrating Stewart – The End of an Era

With Jon Stewart’s reign at The Daily Show coming to an end tonight, it’s time to celebrate the man whose cultural influence knows no bounds. After taking over The Daily Show in 1999 (previously hosted by Craig Kilborn), Stewart went on to create a new type of news series. The Daily Show may be a comedic weeknight show, but above all, it’s critical commentary. In filling the role of Daily Show host – a role seemingly created for Stewart – he made the news entertaining. The result was attainable social and political critique, which has changed the way millions of Americans will consume their news forever. Aside from his obvious comedic and journalistic influence, Stewart has launched the careers of countless comedians including Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Ed Helms, and Kristen Schaal, among others. As a result of their popularity on The Daily Show, three of his correspondents went on to host their own shows: Stephen Colbert of The Colbert Report, John Oliver of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, and Larry Wilmore of The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore. Aside from Saturday Night Live, can you think of …

Countdown to ‘Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp’

I’ll never forget the first time I saw Wet Hot American Summer. It was a wet, hot, Tucson summer, and my friends and I decided to check out this movie we had never heard of that was playing at a cult classics screening at The Loft Cinema, a southern Arizona staple. Earlier in the day I glanced at the film’s IMDb page (what a cast!) and watched the trailer, and in that moment, I knew I had found my newest comedic obsession. Needless to say, I LOVED EVERY SECOND OF IT. Now I try to watch WHAS at least once a year, and I’ve subsequently also fallen in love with David Wain/Michael Showalter’s newest gem, They Came Together. So when I heard WHAS was going to be made into a Netflix Original Series, I was BEYOND ECSTATIC. Anyhoo, Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp premieres on Netflix tomorrow. I’m going to be out-of-town for the weekend, but as soon as I return, I’m diving right in. I don’t want to binge too hard, because I enjoy savoring a show, but we’ll see how my attempts …

Charming and Thoughtful, “Young Like Us” Explores Female Friendships Amidst the Complications of Post-College Life

Oh the trials and tribulations of post-college life. We’re led to believe that once we graduate everything will fall perfectly into place, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Life becomes exponentially more complicated, and the friends who were like family during college are now drifting in opposite directions. At times, it’s a struggle even knowing who you are or where you’re going. How do you continue on your own down the path you’ve foraged? And how do you keep your friendships together in the process? “Young Like Us” – a charming and thoughtful eight-episode web series on YouTube – asks these questions and more. The series features three ex-roommates, Mia, Ava, and Charlie, who start a fake band in order to sustain their bond after they’ve graduated and moved out of their Brooklyn apartment. Their band-practice room becomes a place of refuge, where they can escape together and share the tales of their daily struggles and triumphs. Through their music, the characters are able to explore feelings about relationships, sexuality, identity, and what the future may hold. In each …

Netflix Recommendations: From Poland to North Korea

Ida Directed by → Pawel Pawlikowski Written by → Pawel Pawlikowski and Rebecca Lenkiewicz Starring → Agata Kulesza and Agata Trzebuchowska Synopsis → “Anna, a young novitiate nun in 1960s Poland, is on the verge of taking her vows when she discovers a dark family secret dating back to the years of the Nazi occupation.” Why I enjoyed it → If you can’t handle deeply depressing films, then Ida is not for you. But if you can, and you enjoy simple story telling and stunning cinematography, then you should give it a shot. Ida is one of the saddest movies I’ve seen in recent memory, but it is so well done that I found myself in complete awe of its beauty. It is unadorned on the surface, but vast in its emotional impact. The austere simplicity of the art direction and cinematography, spectacularly raw performances, and gut-wrenchingly sorrowful story that somehow remains hopeful, makes it one of the best films of 2013. Inequality for All  Directed by → Jacob Kornbluth Synopsis → “A documentary that follows former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he looks to raise awareness of the country’s widening economic …