All posts tagged: Economy

25 Reasons Why I’m Voting for Hillary Clinton

Here are 25 reasons why I’m voting for Hillary Clinton this November: Hillary Clinton is the most experienced person to have ever run for President of the United States. She has spent her entire career fighting for the rights of children. The next President will potentially have to fill multiple Supreme Court seats, and I trust that she’ll make sound appointments (who won’t vote to repeal Roe v. Wade or the Marriage Equality Act). America’s wealthiest citizens should pay their fair share in taxes, and her policies reflect that. Hillary Clinton supports Planned Parenthood. She’s also a champion for women’s reproductive rights and equal pay. She believes that community college should be free for every American. She knows that global climate change means that the future of our planet is in jeopardy. I want a President who will protect and strengthen the Affordable Care Act. She’s a strong advocate for gun reform. Not only is Hillary exceptionally intelligent and diplomatic, but she’s tough too! She cares about building a more robust middle class. In 1995, at the United Nations Fourth World Conference on …

Millennials & the Age of Social Media

For the first time in U.S. history it’s been predicted that the current crop of young-adults (also known as Generation Y or Millennials) won’t be more successful than their parents. As a middle class millennial gal, this information is especially concerning for myself and my peers. Isn’t doing as well as our parents (if not better) the epitome of the middle class, American dream? Our grandparents worked hard to give their children more than they had, and our parents went on to do the same. Some consider millennials to be a notorious group of entitled jerks (and many of us are), but I can’t help but feel affected by more complicated issues than generational narcissism, like the current demands of the economy, our broken education system, and the consumer-driven values of society at large. I also feel that the internet has propelled us into a bunch of “chronic comparers.” Though oftentimes unknowingly, we are constantly comparing ourselves to the online facades of others. Just one look at an Instagram feed and you can see images of your peers attending Harvard or vacationing in Hawaii. Online, everyone (including you and me) is …

Skid Row & Los Angeles’ Income Gap

Yesterday I showed up to work two hours early, so I originally wrote this post sitting in a coffee shop, drinking coffee and scribbling with my bright red pen in a crisp new notebook that I had just bought because I had nothing on me. Empty notebooks are exciting objects. What will I fill the pages of this new one with? The feeling of not knowing what is to come is quite freeing. I just write and write and write until there are no more pages left and I’m forced to buy yet another one and fill it with more. Most of what I write is nonsense – lists and goals and dates and appointments – but sometimes, it sticks. Here’s what I chose to write about: Since I moved to Los Angeles, a lot has changed. I realized that I was strong enough to do it, but I am going through the motions of missing home immensely. For some reason I was under the impression that moving to LA was going to be an easy transition, because in many ways, it’s similar …

Netflix Recommendations: From Poland to North Korea

Ida Directed by → Pawel Pawlikowski Written by → Pawel Pawlikowski and Rebecca Lenkiewicz Starring → Agata Kulesza and Agata Trzebuchowska Synopsis → “Anna, a young novitiate nun in 1960s Poland, is on the verge of taking her vows when she discovers a dark family secret dating back to the years of the Nazi occupation.” Why I enjoyed it → If you can’t handle deeply depressing films, then Ida is not for you. But if you can, and you enjoy simple story telling and stunning cinematography, then you should give it a shot. Ida is one of the saddest movies I’ve seen in recent memory, but it is so well done that I found myself in complete awe of its beauty. It is unadorned on the surface, but vast in its emotional impact. The austere simplicity of the art direction and cinematography, spectacularly raw performances, and gut-wrenchingly sorrowful story that somehow remains hopeful, makes it one of the best films of 2013. Inequality for All  Directed by → Jacob Kornbluth Synopsis → “A documentary that follows former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he looks to raise awareness of the country’s widening economic …