All posts tagged: Education

The Lessons I Had to Learn in Order to Survive Grad School

WOOHOO. I did what I honestly wasn’t sure I’d be able to do and finished graduate school. I’m grateful for the opportunity to pursue a graduate degree at such a prestigious university, but ultimately I’m most thankful for how I’ve grown as a person over these past two years. No matter what you’re studying, graduate school is extremely time-consuming, stressful, and often highly competitive. In my first semester we were required to take a professionalization course in which we learned about conferences, academia, and a lot of things that didn’t pertain to me since I was never interested in becoming a professor or pursuing a PhD. But one concept stuck with me, and that was the dreaded and all-consuming Imposter Syndrome. My entire graduate school experience was shaped by this syndrome, which Wikipedia characterizes as “a concept describing high-achieving individuals who are marked by an inability to internalize their accomplishments and a persistent fear of being exposed as a ‘fraud’.” (And yes, I wanted to use Wikipedia as a source since it’s such an academic no-no). I felt like an …

25 Reasons Why I’m Voting for Hillary Clinton

Here are 25 reasons why I’m voting for Hillary Clinton this November: Hillary Clinton is the most experienced person to have ever run for President of the United States. She has spent her entire career fighting for the rights of children. The next President will potentially have to fill multiple Supreme Court seats, and I trust that she’ll make sound appointments (who won’t vote to repeal Roe v. Wade or the Marriage Equality Act). America’s wealthiest citizens should pay their fair share in taxes, and her policies reflect that. Hillary Clinton supports Planned Parenthood. She’s also a champion for women’s reproductive rights and equal pay. She believes that community college should be free for every American. She knows that global climate change means that the future of our planet is in jeopardy. I want a President who will protect and strengthen the Affordable Care Act. She’s a strong advocate for gun reform. Not only is Hillary exceptionally intelligent and diplomatic, but she’s tough too! She cares about building a more robust middle class. In 1995, at the United Nations Fourth World Conference on …

Millennials & the Age of Social Media

For the first time in U.S. history it’s been predicted that the current crop of young-adults (also known as Generation Y or Millennials) won’t be more successful than their parents. As a middle class millennial gal, this information is especially concerning for myself and my peers. Isn’t doing as well as our parents (if not better) the epitome of the middle class, American dream? Our grandparents worked hard to give their children more than they had, and our parents went on to do the same. Some consider millennials to be a notorious group of entitled jerks (and many of us are), but I can’t help but feel affected by more complicated issues than generational narcissism, like the current demands of the economy, our broken education system, and the consumer-driven values of society at large. I also feel that the internet has propelled us into a bunch of “chronic comparers.” Though oftentimes unknowingly, we are constantly comparing ourselves to the online facades of others. Just one look at an Instagram feed and you can see images of your peers attending Harvard or vacationing in Hawaii. Online, everyone (including you and me) is …

My Advice for Incoming Grad Students

After completing my first year of graduate school, I jotted down a list of things I had learned and wished I knew before starting my program. While each graduate student’s experience can be astronomically different from the next’s (depending on one’s school, program, and their tendencies as a student) there are a few pieces of advice that I think are somewhat universal when it comes to surviving graduate school, and more importantly, retaining your happiness and wellbeing in the process. 1. Having great time management skills is necessary for getting through your program… Time management isn’t just a good school skill, it’s a necessary life skill. In order to make it through your masters program you must understand your priorities for every day, week, month, semester, and year. How each individual deals best with organizing their time varies person to person, but for a good starting point check out About Education’s list of general tips for time management in graduate school. 2. Practicing self-care is crucial… A few months ago I posted about practicing self-care, which I think is important no matter what stage of your life you are in. …

Watch the Inspiring Trailer for ‘He Named Me Malala’

Emotional films often bring tears to my eyes, but only the most touching previews are capable of doing so. The trailer for He Named Me Malala is one of those rarities. Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist fighting for education rights for girls and young women, is both a survivor of an assassination attempt and the and youngest ever Nobel Prize laureate. Like millions of people across the globe, I look up to her strength and courage immensely, and am in awe of all she has accomplished thus far. Please share the trailer for He Named Me Malala and be sure to see it when it hits theaters in October. And if you’re interested, visit the Malala Fund to find out how you can make a difference.

College Reflections

This weekend my boyfriend graduated from The University of Arizona, bringing any academic connection I had to my undergraduate experience to a close. I am unbelievably excited for him, but the moment was still a little bitter-sweet. Yesterday we stopped for brunch at a restaurant near the university, and after our meal we decided to go for a walk along the iconic mall that runs down the center of campus. It was an especially wonderful desert winter day and we found ourselves reminiscing about the many years we spent on campus, even before we attended school there. For most Tucsonans, including those who didn’t attend The U of A, there’s something wonderfully sacred and significant about our school. Not only is our campus beautiful, but it’s a sanctuary where anyone can come to learn, explore, and try new things. Whether you’re riding a bike down a path, watching a basketball game, studying, or playing frisbee on the mall, visitors can seek refuge in that wonderful place of discovery. Although I graduated 1.5 years ago, our final walk through campus gave me the closure I …

Twenty-Something

Today I’m revisiting a guest post I wrote last July for a blog about being in your 20’s. A lot has changed, but my general ideas about being young and hopeful are still the same. I can’t imagine a time when I wasn’t absolutely positive I’d find a place for myself in the film or television industry. It’s this gut feeling I’ve had for as long as I can remember, and although it may be naïve, it’s something I’ll never give up on. I graduated in May of 2013 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film & Television Production from The University of Arizona. I plan to attend graduate school in the near future in pursuit of a master’s degree in film studies. Graduate school seems like the most logical next step, particularly since I love to learn and feel as though I haven’t gotten my fill quite yet. My interests include festival programming, film criticism, screenwriting, and production design — and I’m going to try my best to give them all a shot. …

Lessons Learned: Post-Graduation

This past spring I was swamped. I had two jobs, an internship, and a full course-load. I was also trying to finish my thesis project and last semester of my undergraduate career. Now that I’m maybe 1/1000th as busy as I was then, I don’t even know how I made it through. College was a lot of fun, but I was running on an empty tank for the last two years and was happy to finally get to re-fuel. That was a seriously dorky analogy, but exactly how I felt. In the midst of the most stressful year of my life, I sat down and thought about the lessons of college – specifically my last year. I wrote them down and ended up with a pretty intense list. Now that I’ve graduated I have a few more thoughts. LESSONS FROM UNDERGRAD (IN PARTICULAR, SENIOR YEAR) Know who you are. Know your self worth. You are stronger than you think. People will always doubt you. At least a handful, if not more. You doubt others too. …