All posts tagged: entertainment

Tips on Marketing Your Short Film or Web Series

How To Market Your Short Film or Web Series [ and spread the word about your fundraising campaign ] 1. First things first – consider your audience. Is your short film or web series a comedy? Horror? A horror comedy? Know who would genuinely enjoy your project and who wouldn’t. Make your intended audience as defined as possible. The tendency will be to say that anyone of any age will be interested in your project, but that’s simply not the case. Be honest with yourself. 2. After you’ve pinpointed your audience, create a marketing timeline that coincides with production. For example, during pre-production you will want to start developing a fan base through social media, and by the end of your film you may be looking for distributors and sharing your press kit. Have a marketing strategy for every point of production and beyond. 3. If you are fundraising for your film or web series, be sure to build hype before you launch your campaign. Know that you will essentially be marketing for two entirely …

Flying Lotus – Until the Quiet Comes

In a new series (VIDEO OF THE DAY) I will be posting short films and music videos multiple times per week. From this year’s Sundance Shorts, Until the Quiet Comes, directed by Kahlil Joseph, features three songs by underground musician and producer, Flying Lotus. A magical combination of both mood and rhythm, Joseph’s film is one of the most captivating shorts I have ever seen. The hauntingly beautiful cinematography was done by Matthew J. Lloyd. Truly, one of my favorites.

‘Short Term 12’ – A Must See Film

Short Term 12 is a devastatingly beautiful examination of vulnerability and hardship. Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, the film stars Brie Larson, John Gallagher Jr., and Kaitlyn Dever. Grace (Larson) is a supervisor at a facility for at-risk teens. She is strong and insistent, yet flexible and nurturing. Her long-time boyfriend and co-worker, Mason (Gallagher Jr.), is equally as compassionate and resilient. Each teen at the facility has their own troubling story and their own ways of coping. Marcus, played by Keith Stanfield, deals with his emotions by writing and rapping, while Jayden (Dever) writes stories and draws. As the film progresses it becomes clear that Grace has many problems of her own, and her way of coping is to help others. Amazingly written and wonderfully acted, Short Term 12 exemplifies how a stellar cast and intriguing story can create something that’s truly one of a kind. I could review Short Term 12 in-depth, and go on and on about why I love it. But instead I ask that you see it for yourself. It’s really that …

‘Jobs’ Disappoints, but Kutcher Doesn’t

This week I wrote a review of Jobs for Critics Associated. Read it here, or check out the original. Though unintentional, Jobs provided a number of laugh-out-loud moments. It’s ironic that a film about a well-known perfectionist can be so unbelievably far from perfect. Though against all odds, it seems Ashton Kutcher is not at fault for this week’s box office bomb. His performance as Steve Jobs is good, particularly in his physical recreation of the Apple tycoon, but it’s certainly not great. Problems with Jobs are abundant and obvious, specifically in regards to the writing. Basic conversations are cluttered with “Steve’s,” – each character throwing around the name as though it’s a form of product placement. The film’s dialogue would seem significantly less contrived if the actors only said the name in moments it was naturally necessary. Hearing “Hey Steve,” “Bye Steve,” and “Thanks Steve,” every few minutes or so forces the already poorly written dialogue to appear blatantly artificial. Jobs may leave you wondering: Is this a joke? Ultimately, the issues with Jobs lie in the writing …

Review of ‘Lee Daniels’ The Butler’

This week I wrote a review of Lee Daniels’ The Butler for Critics Associated. Read it here, or check out the the original. Inspired by the life of Eugene Allen, a butler who served the White House for 34 years until retiring in 1986, Lee Daniels and co-writer Danny Strong present a powerful story about the complexities of the civil rights movement in the United States. Lee Daniels’ The Butler features an abundance of famous actors including Forest Whitaker as Cecil Gaines, a strong-willed butler who is proud to serve his country, and Oprah Winfrey as Gloria Gaines, his persistent and loyal wife. A plethora of other well-known actors grace the screen including Terrence Howard, Cuba Gooding Jr., Lenny Kravitz, Robin Williams, John Cusack, James Marsden, Liev Schreiber, Alan Rickman, and Jane Fonda. In three tumultuous decades Cecil serves eight Presidents and experiences the civil rights movement from both a political and social perspective. Gaines has two sons, both of which have completely distinct visions of racial equality and the ways in which to achieve it. Charlie, played by …

Cultural Observation: The Kardashians and Wealth

In an interview with Amazon this past week President Barack Obama discussed the American dream and how our entertainment culture has changed what success means to many. “I don’t think people went around saying to themselves: ‘I need to have a 10,000 square foot house’. We weren’t exposed to things we didn’t have in the same way kids these days are. There was not that window into the lifestyles of the rich and famous. Kids weren’t monitoring every day what Kim Kardashian was wearing, or where Kanye West was going on vacation, and thinking that somehow that was the mark of success.” The President’s comments have since become the subject of scrutiny, supplying Kris Jenner with new material to fill her daytime talk show (which isn’t doing too well). Although I’m generally entertained by the Kardashians (though find them extremely problematic), I think Kris completely missed the mark in her response to the President’s statements. President Obama’s comments weren’t meant to question the success of Kim & Kanye – whether they work hard or not is irrelevant. It’s that the …

‘Frances Ha’: Not Perfect, but Wonderfully Good

I loved Frances Ha. Here’s why: 1. Greta Gerwig is fantastic as Frances. Absolutely and completely fantastic. 2. I can’t help but see a little bit of myself in her character – as I’m sure every young woman can. 3. It was beautifully shot. I’m also a sap for some good ole’ black and white film. 4. The french new wave influence is pretty obvious and pretty wonderful. 5. Frances is a real girl. She is unsure, curious, clumsy, funny, and self-deprecating. She knows exactly what she wants and won’t give up, but stumbles along the way. She’s genuine, and genuinely written. She’s flawed, but terribly awesome. 6. There are major ups and downs in Frances and Sophie’s friendship, and they’re natural. Everyone has drifted apart from the person they thought they’d be close with forever. It’s an inevitable part of growing up, and Frances Ha presents it honestly and with humor. 7. It’s a coming-of-age/quarter-life-crisis film. 8. I appreciate the realism in the subtle moments of dialogue, eye contact, and awkward body language. It’s true to what 20-somethings discovering themselves are …