All posts tagged: Feminist

LA’s Women’s March 2018

This past weekend marked one year since the “You’re Fired” guy became the U.S. president. Sad! Very sad… Taking part in last year’s Women’s March in Los Angeles was an indescribable experience. I had been crushed by the election and inauguration, but witnessing the turnout that day gave me immense hope. An estimated 750,000 people shuffled around downtown LA, yelling, hugging, crying, laughing, and chanting. To share that experience with so many people – who cared and were scared too – made 1/21/2017 one of the most invigorating days of my life. This year’s Women’s March was nearly as exciting. In the wake of the #MeToo movement and the fight to protect DACA recipients and undocumented immigrants, the energy in the air was full of anger and determination. With a turn out of around 500,000 according to Mayor Eric Garcetti, LA proved once again that we are a city that shows up for all people. This is what democracy looks like, and this is what America looks like too. Below are a few pics I snapped during the march – …

I’m Still Mad That “Good Girls Revolt” Was Cancelled

It’s been a little over a year since the premiere of Good Girl’s Revolt on Amazon, and a little over a year since its cancellation. The stellar series was created by Dana Calvo and is based on journalist Lynn Povich’s memoir of the same title. In her memoir, Povich details the discrimination lawsuit women at Newsweek launched against the publication in 1970. When I started Good Girls Revolt in November of 2016 (it premiered 10/28/16), Hillary Clinton had just lost the election. I was in absolute shock, punched in the gut by the reality that this country elected a racist idiot who jokes about sexual assault instead of a well qualified woman. I still have a difficult time facing the meaning behind her loss – and his win – and all that it says about this country and the people who inhabit it. At that time Good Girls Revolt offered a reprieve. It was a show created by women, for women, and I felt that energy in every ounce of its being. In early December of 2016, just a little over …

Lena Dunham’s Rich White Kids

I haven’t had the time to blog lately, so I wanted to jump back into things with a super short post on Lena Dunham. This is just something I wrote on my notes app one night last week, so my thoughts aren’t fully fleshed out, nor are they particularly well assembled. I was thinking a lot about Lena Dunham after she defended an accused rapist and had one of her Lenny Letter writers quit, citing “hipster racism.” Dunham has been doing and saying problematic things for years, and although I really wanted to be a fan (she’s an outspoken writer/director/producer and I look up to that) her work has consistently rubbed me the wrong way. One of the things that has always made Lena Dunham’s work a bit difficult for me to digest (beginning with Tiny Furniture, even though I enjoyed it overall) is that her very wealthy artist New Yorker background is so much a part of her storytelling. Her film, TV series, and writing is always about white girls, but specifically elitist, posh, rich white girls, which is …

Brown, Kiddo, & Tarantino

OR: Tarantino’s Leading Ladies: Jackie Brown, Beatrix Kiddo, & Women’s Empowerment On-screen Quentin Tarantino’s body of work – from his feature film debut Reservoir Dogs (1992), to his most recent epic The Hateful Eight (2015) – consists of films that are violent, highly stylized, dialogue-driven, oftentimes problematic, and always provocative. Though each film in Tarantino’s oeuvre is quite different from the one that came before it or followed, numerous qualities of his work remain consistent. In each of his films Tarantino celebrates popular culture by commemorating genres that were once relegated to the margins by Hollywood, such as martial arts cinema, Blaxploitation, and spaghetti westerns. While appropriating genres, Tarantino provides his own authorial stamp by writing dialogue-driven scripts which are benefited by episodic structures. A “Tarantino film,” one can almost always be assured, features revenge at the heart of the narrative and creates pleasure through the irreverent combination of humor and violence. And, with each of Tarantino’s films, the appropriateness of his representations of violence, race, gender, and revisionist history, come into question time and …

30 Badass Feminists to Follow on Twitter

I’ve discovered so many intelligent, humorous, bold, and inspiring feminists on Twitter. These women are writers, activists, lawyers, scholars, and artists who advocate for a number of issues essential to the feminist movement, including immigration, reproductive rights, safety and equality for the LGBT community, combating racism and police brutality, fair wages and the right to unionize, gun control and domestic violence, and the representation of race, gender, class, and sexuality in media – among numerous other issues. Being an outspoken woman online automatically results in a threat to their safety, and these women are berated daily for their unwillingness to be quiet or dilute their words. Be sure to follow them on social media and share and support their work. Like any online list, this post is seriously incomplete because there are thousands of woman who have not been included. Please be sure to share the names and handles of any badass feminists you follow online in the comment section below. Ijeoma Oluo → @IjeomaOluo Lauren Duca → @laurenduca Roxane Gay → @rgay Feminista Jones → @FeministaJones Caroline O.→ @RVAwonk …

PHOTOS: Women’s March Los Angeles

The Women’s March on Washington went global y’all (see: Pictures From Women’s Marches on Every Continent). And the Los Angeles sister march drew over 750,000 protestors – more than 10 times the number expected! Taking to the streets with a diverse community of progressive feminists (from all ages and walks of life) was an experience that meant so much to me. In spite of a dreadful Friday, and past year, the Women’s March served as a beam of light. There I saw hope in the form of thousands and thousands of people who are prepared to resist our frightening and repressive administration. We are the resistance. We will fight oppression and injustice together. In the words of Hillary Clinton’s campaign slogan, we’re stronger together. Oh, and love trumps hate! Here are some photos from the LA women’s march. Though they don’t capture the scope of the march or the shared sense of urgency permeating the air, I thought they were worth sharing:

25 Reasons Why I’m Voting for Hillary Clinton

Here are 25 reasons why I’m voting for Hillary Clinton this November: Hillary Clinton is the most experienced person to have ever run for President of the United States. She has spent her entire career fighting for the rights of children. The next President will potentially have to fill multiple Supreme Court seats, and I trust that she’ll make sound appointments (who won’t vote to repeal Roe v. Wade or the Marriage Equality Act). America’s wealthiest citizens should pay their fair share in taxes, and her policies reflect that. Hillary Clinton supports Planned Parenthood. She’s also a champion for women’s reproductive rights and equal pay. She believes that community college should be free for every American. She knows that global climate change means that the future of our planet is in jeopardy. I want a President who will protect and strengthen the Affordable Care Act. She’s a strong advocate for gun reform. Not only is Hillary exceptionally intelligent and diplomatic, but she’s tough too! She cares about building a more robust middle class. In 1995, at the United Nations Fourth World Conference on …

The Best of Broadly

Today I wanted to post some of my favorite videos from Broadly’s YouTube channel. Broadly is a feminist offshoot of Vice, and it’s great source for interesting and informative women-centric content. From an interview with a trans porn star, to a piece on how women will suffer if Britain leaves the European Union – Broadly’s features are as diverse as those who contribute to the site and utilize it. Although I’ve only selected six videos to link below, all of Broadly’s short documentaries are worth watching, so be sure to check out their channel!  Radical Life of The First Lady of New York   This Cult Nail Artist Has the World at Her Fingertips   The Land Where Women Rule: Inside China’s Last Matriarchy   Inside the Weird World of an Islamic ‘Feminist’ Cult   The Land of No Men: Inside Kenya’s Women-Only Village   Virginie Despentes on Killing Rapists

My Favorite Quotes from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s “We Should All Be Feminists”

“The person more qualified to lead is not the physically stronger person. It is the more intelligent, the more knowledgeable, the more creative, more innovative. And there are no hormones for those attributes.” “Gender as it functions today is a grave injustice. I am angry. We should all be angry. Anger has a long history of bringing about positive change. But I am also hopeful, because I believe deeply in the ability of human beings to remake themselves for the better.” “What struck me – with her and with many other female American friends I have – is how invested they are in being ‘liked’. How they have been raised to believe that their being likeable is very important and that this ‘likeable’ trait is a specific thing. And that specific thing does not include showing anger or being aggressive or disagreeing too loudly.” “We spend too much time teaching girls to worry about what boys think of them. But the reverse is not the case. We don’t teach boys to care about being likeable.” “Gender matters …

“Thelma & Louise” Turns 25

Thelma & Louise (dir. Ridley Scott) premiered on May 24th, 1991, making today the 25th anniversary of the film. At the time of its release it was noted as being a fantastically feminist movie, and it remains completely relevant to this day. Thelma & Louise is a celebration of friendship and sisterhood, which encompasses some of the complexities and complications of being a woman. In honor of the film’s 25th anniversary, below are just a few stills, complete with a shirtless Brad Pitt. 🙂 Enjoy! And if you have a story about your first time seeing Thelma & Louise, please share it in the comment section below!