All posts tagged: Film Review

Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’

Negative criticism is fun to write. It leaves us with an air of self-satisfaction, and from the safety our position accords, it allows us to poke fun at someone else’s vision; an opportunity we grasp at as critics. But to fall in love with a film is the greatest treasure offered by cinema. It’s the mesmerizing and enchanting feeling that leaves us spellbound and in awe, and is what drives us to continue to watch films. No such negative criticism should be embellished upon Richard Linklater’s coming-of-age drama, for it’s a peerless effort that stands alone. Boyhood follows the story of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) from age five to eighteen, where we live and breathe his experiences from boyhood through adolescence. We see him bicker often with his sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater), and join him right through his relatable teenage episodes that seem as real as the grooves in the palms of your hands. Filmed over twelve years, and lovingly sutured together, Richard Linklater’s vision transforms into reality. It’s almost as if we are offered snippets of Ellar Coltrane’s life …

REVIEW: “Drinking Buddies”

Drinking Buddies, written and directed by Joe Swanberg, is a romantic comedy starring Olivia Wilde, Jake Johnson, Anna Kendrick, and Ron Livingston. The film examines the romantic lives of Kate (Wilde) and Luke (Johnson), best friends and co-workers who seem to have more chemistry than a ‘Breaking Bad’ episode. The catch? They’re both in serious relationships with other people. And after a double-date weekend trip, things become even more complex when their significant others seem to have a little chemistry of their own. Laughter, tears, and complication ensue. Cleverness aside, I absolutely loved Drinking Buddies. I’ll admit that as a ‘New Girl’/Jake Johnson fan, I may be biased. He’s just too good at being the goofy guy who’s totally cute and secretly in love with a cool girl (that you mentally replace with yourself). But at its core, Drinking Buddies is a spectacularly simple movie about a not-so-simple topic: Love, lust, romance, and relationships. And what’s wonderful about Swanberg’s film is that it doesn’t fall victim to cliches or evolve as a stereo-typical rom-com. The viewer is left dangling, as unsure where …

‘Jobs’ Disappoints, but Kutcher Doesn’t

This week I wrote a review of Jobs for Critics Associated. Read it here, or check out the original. Though unintentional, Jobs provided a number of laugh-out-loud moments. It’s ironic that a film about a well-known perfectionist can be so unbelievably far from perfect. Though against all odds, it seems Ashton Kutcher is not at fault for this week’s box office bomb. His performance as Steve Jobs is good, particularly in his physical recreation of the Apple tycoon, but it’s certainly not great. Problems with Jobs are abundant and obvious, specifically in regards to the writing. Basic conversations are cluttered with “Steve’s,” – each character throwing around the name as though it’s a form of product placement. The film’s dialogue would seem significantly less contrived if the actors only said the name in moments it was naturally necessary. Hearing “Hey Steve,” “Bye Steve,” and “Thanks Steve,” every few minutes or so forces the already poorly written dialogue to appear blatantly artificial. Jobs may leave you wondering: Is this a joke? Ultimately, the issues with Jobs lie in the writing …