All posts tagged: gif

Tommy Wiseau, Vegan Pizza, & Gifs

I really enjoyed putting together this casual newsletter-style post back in June, so I thought I’d do another! Here’s what I’ve been watching, listening to, reading, thinking about, doing, eating, and fawning over. What have you been into lately? WATCHING Not to be dramatic, but I’ve been so busy lately that I haven’t had time to watch much TV or go to the movies. As far as television goes I’m currently watching Stranger Things, Transparent, Golden Girls, X-Files, Master of None, and Star Trek: The Next Generation. I’m basically part-way through all of these shows but haven’t been watching consistently. But I did binge the past 10 episodes of I Love You America with Sarah Silverman on Hulu the other night and I LOVE IT — YOU SHOULD WATCH! This past week I saw Star Wars: The Last Jedi and attended the 30th anniversary screening of Die Hard. The movies I plan on FINALLY watching this week include Lady Bird, The Florida Project, and The Disaster Artist, and I’m hoping to see Call Me By Your Name, Lemon, and Lucky soon. Oh can we talk about The Disaster Artist trailer for a …

Moments of Symmetry – “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

If “auteur” were defined on Urban Dictionary.com, it would include a picture of Wes Anderson and stills from some of his uniquely well-crafted films. However, it has not been defined, so no such definition exists. Maybe when I’m bored I’ll add it.  Anyhoo, back to Wes Anderson//auteur theory… In recent years (with films such as The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox) Wes Anderson’s visual aesthetic has seem to become even more meticulous and well defined. In a short video entitled Mise En Scène & The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson, Anderson discusses his visual style in various interviews (including one with Terry Gross), mentioning his interest in theater as a recurring influence (video credit: Way Too Indie).   After watching The Grand Budapest Hotel (which for the record, I absolutely loved) one aesthetic tendency became very clear to me – even more so than in any Wes Anderson film I had seen before: s y m m e t r y. Nearly ever shot is painstakingly symmetrical, which lends itself to creating the sort of whimsical world within reality that Wes Anderson is known for. The …