All posts tagged: Growing up

What “Lady Bird” Means to Me

When I finally watched Greta Gerwig’s beautiful Lady Bird, I felt so much and still do. Unlike Lady Bird I have a wonderful mom who’s kind and understanding, I was never ashamed of my socio-economic status, and I wouldn’t lie to a peer about the house I live in or who I’m friends with. But like Lady Bird I wanted to go to college in New York City despite never having been there, felt stifled by the mid-sized city I called home, and was sure that there were bigger and better things out there for me – whatever that actually means. Lady Bird somehow brought me back to my undergraduate years, when I felt like the world was this new and exciting place to explore and express myself within. Since then I’ve grown to be more realistic and a bit cynical, but seeing Lady Bird’s struggle to figure herself out reminded me of a part of myself I had forgotten. While I’m much more sure of myself than I was in college, I missed the hopefulness I found within my confusion. I …

26 Goals for My 26th Year

For the past couple of years I’ve done a post on my birthday (last year’s was 25 of my favorite things/feelings, and the year before was 24 lessons I’ve learned in 24 years). Although I’m not the type of person who cares too much about birthdays, I’ve enjoyed doing these posts because they provide me with the opportunity to reflect on my life thus far and give some thought to the future. It feels like just yesterday that I wrote that post for my 24th birthday, but it’s been two years! Does anyone else feel like time seems to move faster the older you get? Anyways, this year I decided my birthday list would be 26 things I’d like to do/accomplish in my 26th year. Let me know in the comment section below what some of your hopes for this year are! 1. Run a 5k without stopping (graduate school has made me out-of-shape and lazy) 2. See New York City for the first time 3. Have one of my essays published on an online publication 4. Have one of my essays published …

Millennials & the Age of Social Media

For the first time in U.S. history it’s been predicted that the current crop of young-adults (also known as Generation Y or Millennials) won’t be more successful than their parents. As a middle class millennial gal, this information is especially concerning for myself and my peers. Isn’t doing as well as our parents (if not better) the epitome of the middle class, American dream? Our grandparents worked hard to give their children more than they had, and our parents went on to do the same. Some consider millennials to be a notorious group of entitled jerks (and many of us are), but I can’t help but feel affected by more complicated issues than generational narcissism, like the current demands of the economy, our broken education system, and the consumer-driven values of society at large. I also feel that the internet has propelled us into a bunch of “chronic comparers.” Though oftentimes unknowingly, we are constantly comparing ourselves to the online facades of others. Just one look at an Instagram feed and you can see images of your peers attending Harvard or vacationing in Hawaii. Online, everyone (including you and me) is …

Summer of Independence

The summer I attended the Cannes Film Festival and spent three weeks in Italy was definitely the best of my life, but this one turned out to be pretty interesting too. I didn’t see Brad Pitt, and I didn’t climb to the top of a castle from the 10th century, but I did learn a lot about myself. These past few months were all about settling in to a new city and experiencing as much as possible before starting graduate school. I had a lot of fun, and I feel like I’ve definitely grown up a bit. As I get older, I find that what’s most difficult is that I’m constantly learning and adapting my world view, and sometimes, it’s hard to keep up. This summer I worked at a store in Beverly Hills, went to my first improv show, attended a Hollywood premiere, rode the subway, volunteered at a film festival, interned at a film festival, roamed the streets of downtown Los Angeles, rediscovered Disneyland, explored museums, showed my mom the city, visited home, and found myself just a little bit closer to becoming the woman I aspire to …

Charming and Thoughtful, “Young Like Us” Explores Female Friendships Amidst the Complications of Post-College Life

Oh the trials and tribulations of post-college life. We’re led to believe that once we graduate everything will fall perfectly into place, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Life becomes exponentially more complicated, and the friends who were like family during college are now drifting in opposite directions. At times, it’s a struggle even knowing who you are or where you’re going. How do you continue on your own down the path you’ve foraged? And how do you keep your friendships together in the process? “Young Like Us” – a charming and thoughtful eight-episode web series on YouTube – asks these questions and more. The series features three ex-roommates, Mia, Ava, and Charlie, who start a fake band in order to sustain their bond after they’ve graduated and moved out of their Brooklyn apartment. Their band-practice room becomes a place of refuge, where they can escape together and share the tales of their daily struggles and triumphs. Through their music, the characters are able to explore feelings about relationships, sexuality, identity, and what the future may hold. In each …

What I’ve Learned Thus Far: 24 Things in 24 Years

1. In everything you do, stay true to yourself. 2. Embrace your mistakes. 3. Know that people act in their best self-interest. 4. Don’t waste your time on those who bring you down. 5. Understand that life is not fair. 6. Make the most out of what you have. 7. Always, always, always be grateful. 8. If you are a person of privilege and advantage, you must help those who are less privileged and disadvantaged. 9. Respect your elders. 10. Confidence is key! Fake it ’til you make it. 11. Don’t sweat the small stuff. 12. Self-love is essential. Take great care of yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally. 13. Make an effort to see and do as much as you can. 14. Set many goals, and constantly be working to achieve them. 15. Know that failure is a part of success. 16. Don’t compare yourself to others. 17. Be there for those you love. 18. Embrace what makes you, you. 19. Say “I love you” often. 20. Do something nice for someone else, daily. 21. Stand by what …

Change – A Bittersweet Feeling

I love change. I thrive off of it. But for the first time in my life I’m making a major change, and it’s surprisingly bittersweet. I didn’t expect I would feel this way. I thought I’d leave my job and move and everything would feel like a simple progression that just made sense. I was sure it would be easy to leave home and forge a new one. But it’s not. It’s terrifying. It wasn’t until recently that I realized that being from Tucson is a substantial part of my identity. All of my closest friends were born and raised here, and there’s a certain understanding about this city that we all share. When it’s a Saturday night and you don’t want to go to the same bar you’ve been to 400 times, it’s annoying. When you damage your tires because there are massive potholes everywhere, it’s terrible. And when it’s summertime and too hot to even step outside for a moment, it’s unbearable. But this strange little city is ours and we’re proud of it. So although I feel ready to move on, …

Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’

Negative criticism is fun to write. It leaves us with an air of self-satisfaction, and from the safety our position accords, it allows us to poke fun at someone else’s vision; an opportunity we grasp at as critics. But to fall in love with a film is the greatest treasure offered by cinema. It’s the mesmerizing and enchanting feeling that leaves us spellbound and in awe, and is what drives us to continue to watch films. No such negative criticism should be embellished upon Richard Linklater’s coming-of-age drama, for it’s a peerless effort that stands alone. Boyhood follows the story of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) from age five to eighteen, where we live and breathe his experiences from boyhood through adolescence. We see him bicker often with his sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater), and join him right through his relatable teenage episodes that seem as real as the grooves in the palms of your hands. Filmed over twelve years, and lovingly sutured together, Richard Linklater’s vision transforms into reality. It’s almost as if we are offered snippets of Ellar Coltrane’s life …

Twenty-Something

Today I’m revisiting a guest post I wrote last July for a blog about being in your 20’s. A lot has changed, but my general ideas about being young and hopeful are still the same. I can’t imagine a time when I wasn’t absolutely positive I’d find a place for myself in the film or television industry. It’s this gut feeling I’ve had for as long as I can remember, and although it may be naïve, it’s something I’ll never give up on. I graduated in May of 2013 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film & Television Production from The University of Arizona. I plan to attend graduate school in the near future in pursuit of a master’s degree in film studies. Graduate school seems like the most logical next step, particularly since I love to learn and feel as though I haven’t gotten my fill quite yet. My interests include festival programming, film criticism, screenwriting, and production design — and I’m going to try my best to give them all a shot. …

Growing Old & Growing Up

“Most people don’t grow up. Most people age. They find parking spaces, honor their credit cards, get married, have children and call that maturity. What that is, is aging.” – Maya Angelou   “You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.” – George Bernard Shaw   “Love does not begin and end the way we seem to think it does. Love is a battle, love is war; love is growing up.”- James Baldwin   “Everyone thinks you make mistakes when you’re young. But I don’t think we make any fewer mistakes when we’re grown up.” – Jodi Picoult   “The trick is growing up without growing old. “- Casey Stengel   “I am convinced that most people do not grow up…We may marry and dare to have children and call that growing up. I think what we do is mostly grow old. We carry accumulation of years in our bodies, and on our faces, but generally our real selves, the real children inside, are innocent and shy as magnolias.” – Maya Angelou   “Parents …