All posts tagged: Independent Film

8 Social Media Tips for Indie Filmmakers

I think I have a fairly strong grasp on marketing, specifically social media marketing, and how to expand the reach of a creative work or business. Why? In college I took courses on film and television promotion, worked as a student brand manager for Red Bull (one of the most well-known and promoted brands in the world; read more here), and during my senior year I marketed an Indiegogo campaign that funded my entire thesis project. Now, I use social media to expand the reach of this blog and am developing a formidable readership. Here are a few of my social media tips for indie filmmakers, but these suggestions can also be used toward any creative or business endeavor: 1. Keep your personal social media accounts professional and always include links to your creative work. 2. Know your audience. 3. Utilize platforms that align with your audience. If you are doing an experimental coming-of-age film, consider using Tumblr and Vimeo for your social media marketing campaign. On the other hand, if you’re working on a social justice documentary, maybe Twitter and YouTube …

‘Short Term 12’ – A Must See Film

Short Term 12 is a devastatingly beautiful examination of vulnerability and hardship. Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, the film stars Brie Larson, John Gallagher Jr., and Kaitlyn Dever. Grace (Larson) is a supervisor at a facility for at-risk teens. She is strong and insistent, yet flexible and nurturing. Her long-time boyfriend and co-worker, Mason (Gallagher Jr.), is equally as compassionate and resilient. Each teen at the facility has their own troubling story and their own ways of coping. Marcus, played by Keith Stanfield, deals with his emotions by writing and rapping, while Jayden (Dever) writes stories and draws. As the film progresses it becomes clear that Grace has many problems of her own, and her way of coping is to help others. Amazingly written and wonderfully acted, Short Term 12 exemplifies how a stellar cast and intriguing story can create something that’s truly one of a kind. I could review Short Term 12 in-depth, and go on and on about why I love it. But instead I ask that you see it for yourself. It’s really that …

Interview with “Autism in Love” Producer, Carolina Groppa

What is love? What does love feel like? How do you know that you’ve fallen in love? Romance and relationships mesh together in a jumble of complexities that inhabit an elaborate region in our hearts and minds. And for those with autism, the journey and discovery can be even more complicated. Autism in Love is a feature length documentary that examines and explores romantic love through the lens of autism. Based in Los Angeles, the team behind the film includes producer Carolina Groppa and director Matt Fuller, both of whom are award winning filmmakers and advocates of social change. Along with Dr. Ira Heilveil, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA Medical School, they are working to create a remarkable documentary that is not only about love, but also about overcoming obstacles and re-defining the status quo. I was lucky enough to talk to the film’s producer, Carolina Groppa, to hear what she has to say about Autism in Love and the journey she’s been on while filming for the past year. JVV: What …

Hollywood’s Impending Doom

American summers are usually characterized by road trips, beach days, lots of sunscreen, and giant box office hits. It’s the season when blockbusters compete to be the biggest and the best, and audiences flock to see them with their summer loves. But 2013 has yet to be so forgiving. A few big budget flops of the summer include The Lone Ranger, RIPD, Turbo, and After Earth. Earlier this summer Steven Spielberg predicted an “implosion” of the film industry, anticipating that a half dozen or so big budget movies would flop at the box office and change the face of Hollywood forever. If Spielberg isn’t convincing enough, George Lucas echoed his thoughts and evidence from the box office is mounting. I can’t help but agree that the future of costly, shallow, special effects driven movies is probably a gloomy one. And by probably, I mean hopefully. There are too many great films to be out-shadowed by ones that rely on over stimulating the senses in order to avoid the truth that there really isn’t much happening. I’ll stand behind Spielberg and Lucas …