All posts tagged: Inspiring

LUNAFEST: Supporting Women in Film

On Wednesday I had the opportunity to attend LUNAFEST in Los Angeles, an evening celebrating films made by, for, and about women. The traveling short film festival, which was started by LUNA in 2000, has been championing women filmmakers for 16 years while also raising money for the Breast Cancer Fund. Last night’s screening, which included four short films by Lara Everly, Dr. Patricia Beckmann-Wells, Joey Ally, and Eva Vives, was exciting, invigorating, and super fun. Not only was each short exceptionally well made, but more impressively, they were all bursting with distinct and captivating authorial voices. Following the screening was a Q&A with the filmmakers, moderated by Janelle Riley of Variety. The center of attention for most of the Q&A was the status of women in film, focusing in particular on how each filmmaker has dealt with issues of inequality and what hopes they have for the future. While it was an honest night that could have ended on a bleak note, the commitment that these women have to telling stories that matter and building strong communities of women in the …

Watch the Inspiring Trailer for ‘He Named Me Malala’

Emotional films often bring tears to my eyes, but only the most touching previews are capable of doing so. The trailer for He Named Me Malala is one of those rarities. Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist fighting for education rights for girls and young women, is both a survivor of an assassination attempt and the and youngest ever Nobel Prize laureate. Like millions of people across the globe, I look up to her strength and courage immensely, and am in awe of all she has accomplished thus far. Please share the trailer for He Named Me Malala and be sure to see it when it hits theaters in October. And if you’re interested, visit the Malala Fund to find out how you can make a difference.

Endearing & Entertaining Oscar Acceptance Speeches

With Academy Award nomination announcements less than two months away, and Oscar movie season in full swing, I thought it would be timely to revisit some of the most endearing and entertaining acceptance speeches:   1. Cuba Gooding Jr. (Best Supporting Actor, Jerry Maguire)   2. Sandra Bullock (Best Actress, The Blind Side) (Starts at 8:50)   3. Adrien Brody (Best Actor, The Pianist)    4. Matt Damon & Ben Affleck (Best Original Screenplay, Good Will Hunting)   5. Kate Winslet (Best Actress, The Reader) (Starts at 6:35)   6. John Wayne (Best Actor, True Grit) (Starts at 1:00)   7. Jennifer Hudson (Best Supporting Actress, Dreamgirls) (Starts at 1:35)   8. Three 6 Mafia (Best Original Song, Hustle & Flow) (Starts at 1:00)   9. Dustin Lance Black (Best Original Screenplay, Milk)   10. Halle Berry (Best Actress, Monster’s Ball)   11. Michael Caine (Best Supporting Actor, The Cider House Rules) (Starts at 2:40)   12. Steven Soderbergh (Best Director, Traffic) (Starts at 1:00)   13. Charlize Theron (Best Actress, Monster) (Starts at 1:50)   14.  Robin Williams (Best Supporting Actor, Good Will Hunting) (Starts at 1:25)   …

‘Short Term 12’ – A Must See Film

Short Term 12 is a devastatingly beautiful examination of vulnerability and hardship. Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, the film stars Brie Larson, John Gallagher Jr., and Kaitlyn Dever. Grace (Larson) is a supervisor at a facility for at-risk teens. She is strong and insistent, yet flexible and nurturing. Her long-time boyfriend and co-worker, Mason (Gallagher Jr.), is equally as compassionate and resilient. Each teen at the facility has their own troubling story and their own ways of coping. Marcus, played by Keith Stanfield, deals with his emotions by writing and rapping, while Jayden (Dever) writes stories and draws. As the film progresses it becomes clear that Grace has many problems of her own, and her way of coping is to help others. Amazingly written and wonderfully acted, Short Term 12 exemplifies how a stellar cast and intriguing story can create something that’s truly one of a kind. I could review Short Term 12 in-depth, and go on and on about why I love it. But instead I ask that you see it for yourself. It’s really that …