All posts tagged: Pete Docter

My Experience at the 2015 LA Film Fest

The LA Film Fest wrapped a week ago and I finished my last day as an intern yesterday. My immediate thoughts? Wow, was the entire experience a blast! First off, if you live in the Los Angeles area I would definitely recommend attending/volunteering/interning at next year’s LA Film Fest. The lineup this year was exceptionally diverse and exciting – a reflection of Film Independent’s dedication to supporting filmmakers and stories that are diverse and innovative – and I can only imagine that next year’s selection will be even better. I’m thankful for the opportunity to meet so many interesting and passionate people at the festival, and I’m also grateful that I had the chance to experience something that truly embodies the spirit of Los Angeles within my first three months living here. Overall, one of the best perks of being an intern was that I was able to attend events! During the festival I wrote about a few of the screenings and talks I attended, which you can check out below: → Diversity Speaks → Making Cool Shit with OK Go → ‘Inside Out’ with Pete Docter Long story short, I …

LA Film Fest: ‘Inside Out’ with Pete Docter

Although the Los Angeles Film Fest officially opens today, last night I was able to attend a pre-festival screening of Pixar’s Inside Out, which was preceded by a Q & A session with the film’s director, Academy Award winner Pete Docter. Docter, who also directed Up and Monsters, Inc., gave spectacular insight into his process as an animator, storyteller, and director. What I found most interesting was his belief that an audience is better able to relate to animated characters because of the way they portray emotion. He said that in many ways, one can feel that they know an animated character better than their own friend; a statement that upon further examination, I must say I agree with. It seems that through the physicality of animated characters, you can know much about them with just a single glance. Docter and moderator Elvis Mitchell discussed how the physical representation of a character, and their introduction to the story-world, work to immediately give you an idea of who they are. One example they used was the shape of the characters in Up: Carl is a block …