All posts tagged: Political

Vote Like Our Future Depends on It (Because It Does)

If you’re reading this and you’re a U.S. citizen, then you should know that the midterm elections are tomorrow. And if you know that the elections are tomorrow then you should be registered to vote and you should be voting. So you’re voting right? Or even better—you voted early? I’m still not quite in the right frame of mind to write lengthy, well-crafted blog posts, so instead I’ll link you to a few really great articles I think are worth reading and some election gifs to post tomorrow, because why not? Articles to read, digest, & share: Roxane Gay’s piece for The New York Times, “You’re Disillusioned. That’s fine. Vote Anyway.“ “If you remain disillusioned or apathetic in this climate, you are complicit. You think your disillusionment is more important than the very real dangers marginalized people in this country live with.” – Roxane Gay s.e. smith’s article for Bitch Media, “The Intimidation Game: Donald Trump and the GOP’s History of Voter Suppression.” Jeff Wise’s essay on Medium, “The Midterm Stakes: A Brief Primer“ VOTE, then Tweet: 

Representations of Urban Space & Masculinity in “Taxi Driver”

Representations of Urban Space & Masculinity in “Taxi Driver” & the Rise of the American Right-Wing Though Martin Scorsese’s 1976 psychological thriller, Taxi Driver, was released over 40 years ago, one could argue that many layers to the film’s harsh societal critiques are just as relevant in today’s sociopolitical climate. By exploring 1970s New York City through the perspective of Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), an intense man whose past we know little about other than that he served in the Vietnam War, Scorsese and screenwriter Paul Schrader allow the audience to see the world through a particularly conservative lens. In the film, Bickle’s taxi cab works as a device that carries him through spaces he may not otherwise occupy. In this vehicle he’s shielded from that which fuels his fear and contempt. He sees, though might not necessarily be seen. He’s a vigilante on the edge of sanity, a sort of messiah figure who strives to clean up the city, though his racist and sexist rational for this metaphoric “clean up” is never stated …

March for Our Lives LA

This past Saturday millions of people marched all over the world to take a stand against gun violence and emphasize the urgency for common sense gun laws. I marched in Los Angeles with my boyfriend and thousands of others to say “Enough is Enough!” The streets of Los Angeles were filled with people from all ages and backgrounds, marching in solidarity. It was a beautiful sight to behold, and I was in awe of all of the young folks who were organizing against a system that has failed them. As adolescents they shouldn’t have to be putting in such difficult work, but I’m so grateful that they are. Check out some of the pictures I took at the Los Angeles march, be sure to follow and support these organizations, and vote! Everytown for Gun Safety Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America Giffords: Courage to Fight Gun Violence Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

WATCH: “Wearing the Big Heart”

When I started Catch-all one of my intentions was to share short films by artists who I felt had something unique and important to say. I haven’t posted any such work in a long time, and I think Wearing the Big Heart by Tony Carter-Hill is a great place to start again. Carter-Hill’s film captures the Los Angeles Women’s March, showcasing the march’s complex mood while revealing remarkably intimate moments within an intense and massive public event. That day meant something very special to me, and I appreciate how Wearing the Big Heart paints the historic Women’s March with such vibrant images and sounds. Carter-Hill’s work is abstract, dynamic, rhythmic, and truly compelling. I was able to ask Tony about what that day meant to him. Here’s a bit of what he had to say: “As people began to walk with their banners held erect and in these colorful costumes, I became more inspired about filming. I thought about reproducing a feeling rather than a narrative, while keeping in mind consciousness and place, national identity, humanistic tendencies, …

#RESISTANCE Playlist

With major news breaking every single day, the enormity of the issues that we’re dealing with in the U.S. and abroad can seem insurmountable. In America, I feel as though we’re on the verge of a collective meltdown. Stress and tensions are mounting and the government seems to be doing everything it can to weaken the people. From blocking refugees, to pulling out of the Paris Agreement, and fighting to dismantle our healthcare system – the list goes on and on. Across the globe we’re seeing an uptick in fascism, and it’s our duty to fight it. On the day of the election I listened to a playlist I made in hopes that Hillary Clinton would become our first woman president. That day didn’t arrive, but I’ve continued to make playlists – for the inauguration and the historic Women’s March – to either get me through the day or strengthen my resolve. Today I wanted to share my #RESISTANCE playlist, which is short, but packs a punch. We have to persist, and listening to music …

Resistance Podcasts

Here’s a list of some of the resistance-related podcasts I’ve come across in recent weeks. My favorite so far is BloomCast, by civil rights attorney (and fellow vegan) Lisa Bloom. Please be sure to share any relevant political podcasts that you’ve been listening to in the comment section. BloomCast: The Voice of the Resistance by Lisa Bloom Pod Save America by Crooked Media Trumpcast by Slate The FourFiftyOne by Summer Brennan Can He Do That? by The Washington Post Indivisible by WNYC And for additional resources check out this post, which I’m continuing to update. Keep resisting! ❤

Resistance Reading List

Ready to resist the new administration and the damage and cultural effects this campaign and election have had, and will continue to have, on the U.S. and our world? Here are a few books I’m planning on reading or re-reading in order to become the most prepared and well educated resistor I can be. Please be sure to share any additional recommendations in the comment section below. A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X and Alex Haley 1984 by George Orwell A Convenient Hatred: The History of Antisemitism by Phyllis Goldstein We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S. – Mexico Border by Justin Akers Chacón and Mike Davis The United States of Fear by Tom Engelhardt One World Now: The Ethics of Globalization by Peter Singer The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead Subterranean Fire: A History of Working Class Radicalism in the United States by Sharon Smith Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian …

Internet Reads: Politics, Pop Culture, & Remembering an Icon

Sometimes I have those weeks where I read a couple of articles that I think are important to share, and that’s been the case these past few weeks! From Muhammad Ali to pop feminism, gun violence, and Donald Trump – here’s a bit of what I’ve been reading: → ‘I Just Wanted to Be Free’: The Radical Reverberations of Muhammad Ali by Dave Zirin → Pop Feminism Doesn’t Mean the End of the Movement by Ann Friedman → Gun Violence Is a Full-Blown National Crisis by Gabrielle Giffords → Donald Unleashes Brazen Assault On the Media, Foreshadowing Free Speech Clampdown by Melissa McEwan What have you been reading? Share your favorite articles in the comment section below!

Beyoncé & Kendrick Lamar: Politicizing Popular Art

American popular culture, specifically from the mid-60s to mid-70s, was highly politicized, critical, and urgent. Calls to action and societal critiques were common in forms of expression created and disseminated within mainstream youth culture. The sheer abundance and popularity of politicized art meant that both creators and consumers were interested in engaging with immediate problems. The imperative for change was palpable. But this sense of American political urgency seemed to diminish in the 1980s, with the election of President Reagan and the establishment of an overpowering neo-conservative ideology. From the 1980s – 2010s, political expression was still a part of mainstream American pop culture, and is exemplified in the work of N.W.A, Shepard Fairey, Michael Moore, and countless others. My intention is not to discount these works, but to say that I am hopeful that America’s youth will collectively become more political again, with the same urgency that characterized the 60s & 70s. Which brings me to Beyoncé and Kendrick Lamar. Already this year, we have experienced two particularly powerful political moments in music: Beyoncé’s release of her music video for “Formation,” and Kendrick Lamar’s Grammy’s performance. …

Celebrating Stewart – The End of an Era

With Jon Stewart’s reign at The Daily Show coming to an end tonight, it’s time to celebrate the man whose cultural influence knows no bounds. After taking over The Daily Show in 1999 (previously hosted by Craig Kilborn), Stewart went on to create a new type of news series. The Daily Show may be a comedic weeknight show, but above all, it’s critical commentary. In filling the role of Daily Show host – a role seemingly created for Stewart – he made the news entertaining. The result was attainable social and political critique, which has changed the way millions of Americans will consume their news forever. Aside from his obvious comedic and journalistic influence, Stewart has launched the careers of countless comedians including Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Ed Helms, and Kristen Schaal, among others. As a result of their popularity on The Daily Show, three of his correspondents went on to host their own shows: Stephen Colbert of The Colbert Report, John Oliver of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, and Larry Wilmore of The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore. Aside from Saturday Night Live, can you think of …