All posts tagged: Reading

Recommended Film & TV Books | Part 1

I’ve been studying film and television in school for some years now, so as a result I’ve amassed quite a collection of film and TV-related books. Here’s part 1 of my recommended media texts list – and you can expect a number of these posts in the future since there are so many books that I’ve found to be truly invaluable. Although I’ve linked each book to Amazon, buy locally if you can find them at your community’s bookstore! Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder: Save the Cat! is, indeed, the last book on screenwriting you’ll ever need. The book includes information on high concept ideas, genre-play, beat sheets, and even a bit of pitching advice. It contains basically everything you need to know about coming up with an idea, writing your script, re-writing your script, and getting it sold. Designs on Film: A Century of of Hollywood Art Direction by Cathy Whitlock: There was a point during college when I thought that I wanted to be a production designer, so my boyfriend got …

Resistance Reading List

Ready to resist the new administration and the damage and cultural effects this campaign and election have had, and will continue to have, on the U.S. and our world? Here are a few books I’m planning on reading or re-reading in order to become the most prepared and well educated resistor I can be. Please be sure to share any additional recommendations in the comment section below. A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X and Alex Haley 1984 by George Orwell A Convenient Hatred: The History of Antisemitism by Phyllis Goldstein We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S. – Mexico Border by Justin Akers Chacón and Mike Davis The United States of Fear by Tom Engelhardt One World Now: The Ethics of Globalization by Peter Singer The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead Subterranean Fire: A History of Working Class Radicalism in the United States by Sharon Smith Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian …

Internet Reads: Politics, Pop Culture, & Remembering an Icon

Sometimes I have those weeks where I read a couple of articles that I think are important to share, and that’s been the case these past few weeks! From Muhammad Ali to pop feminism, gun violence, and Donald Trump – here’s a bit of what I’ve been reading: → ‘I Just Wanted to Be Free’: The Radical Reverberations of Muhammad Ali by Dave Zirin → Pop Feminism Doesn’t Mean the End of the Movement by Ann Friedman → Gun Violence Is a Full-Blown National Crisis by Gabrielle Giffords → Donald Unleashes Brazen Assault On the Media, Foreshadowing Free Speech Clampdown by Melissa McEwan What have you been reading? Share your favorite articles in the comment section below!

Suggested Reading: ‘The Makeup Tax’

My latest Suggested Reading is The Makeup Tax, by Olga Khazan of The Atlantic. Did you know that women who wear makeup tend to earn more and are treated better? Once you understand just how much time, effort, and money women put into their appearance, you realize that it’s a fact that affects women’s lives on a much larger scale than often discussed. The politics of femininity are complicated, and Khazan’s article brings many of the logical implications of the “necessity of beauty” to light. Whether you are a man or woman, wear makeup or not, it’s an article worth reading for all.

Recommended Reading: Ava DuVernay On How to Stay in Control

From Indiewire’s Shipra Harbola Gupta → Tribeca: Ava DuVernay’s 8 Tips to Filmmakers On How to Stay in Control. Ava DuVernay is quickly becoming one of my favorite people to listen to give advice on just about anything – but in particular, filmmaking and living a creative and fulfilling life. Her SXSW Keynote Speech was beautiful and truly informative, and her talk with Q-Tip at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival was no different. It’s so refreshing to read about a woman who is a filmmaker, is making things she believes in, and is doing things her way. Shapira Harbola Gupta breaks down DuVernay’s talk with Q-Tip into 8 tips for filmmakers on staying in control of your work. Check it out here.

Fast Company

I haven’t posted a “Recommended Reading” since this past summer, so I thought it would be a good time to talk about another publication I have recently subscribed to and love: Fast Company. I rarely buy anything placed near the register at a grocery store, but a few months ago I was intrigued by a magazine cover that read “A Billion Fans Can’t Be Wrong: How YouTube is banking on stars like Bethany Mota to recharge Google’s future and fight off Disney and Yahoo.” So I bought it, was hooked, and quickly became a subscriber. Fast Company is a technology, business, and design magazine that was developed in 1995 by previous editors of the Harvard Business Review. The publication focuses on innovation in business and design, featuring articles about up-and-coming companies and old-standbys. Fast Company celebrates creativity, risk-taking, and thinking beyond traditional boundaries. In my first issue I learned about Google’s purchase of YouTube, how YouTube content creators are spilling over into the mainstream entertainment industry, and read about James Cameron’s latest documentary where he completed a record-breaking dive to …

Check it Out: Bitch Media

Although the newspaper and magazine industries have taken a hit in recent years, I still find that there is nothing more enjoyable than waking up and reading something palpable with a hot coffee by my side. Magazines have a certain feel to them; their pages are cool and crisp, with easy to grab edges that turn with a swooshing sound that reminds me of my adolescence. When I am reading a magazine I feel as though I’m taking part in something that may no longer exist during the third act of my life. That is a sentiment that I hope is extraordinarily false. Magazines have a very specific formula that allow them to be appealing to the general masses and even more scholarly sorts. They are usually short enough that they can be consumed quickly, but often include long articles that may take time to fully digest. Sometimes, when a writer has created something that is truly an amazing experience to take in, I must read it twice. To me, that’s journalism at it’s finest. It’s entertaining, educational, and has a voice associated with the …