All posts tagged: Richard Linklater

“Boyhood” – In Defense of My Dissenting Opinion

I’m very opinionated about what I like and dislike, but I’m also keenly aware that my opinion is simply that – an opinion. Just because I don’t like a film does not mean it’s objectively bad. Art is subjective. Filmmaking is art. There was a point after graduating from film school that I considered becoming a critic. Criticism of any medium creates a platform for individuals to examine and analyze media – a practice that I believe is an essential part of any thriving society. What we create, whether it is music, film, or literature, is a direct reflection of our culture. By examining creative forms of expression within our society, we are better suited to understand who we are as a people. Film criticism not only allows critics to respectfully discuss what they enjoyed or didn’t enjoy about a film or television show, but the practice provides the opportunity for all audience members to engage and critically evaluate media. After graduating from college I was (and still am) willing to give anything a shot, …

Netflix Recommendations

This is my first time posting Netflix Instant Queue recommendations, so let me just get the essentials out of the way first. If you have a Netflix account and haven’t watched Breaking Bad yet, you better start now because it’s one of the greatest TV dramas of all time and you’ll love every minute of it. Yes, it can be gruesome at times, but Breaking Bad is certainly worth the watch. Two other essentials are Netflix Originals Orange Is The New Black and House of Cards. These shows are both insanely good, and with only two seasons at 13 episodes each, they’re a fairly quick watch. I’m going to start posting Netflix recommendations every couple of weeks or so, and I would love for anyone to comment below with their suggestions! Twin Peaks Created by Mark Frost and David Lynch, Twin Peaks premiered on ABC on April 8, 1990. The show centers around the small town of Twin Peaks, WA, where the murder of a beautiful young woman disrupts the seemingly tight-knit and quaint  community. The show follows FBI Agent …

Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’

Negative criticism is fun to write. It leaves us with an air of self-satisfaction, and from the safety our position accords, it allows us to poke fun at someone else’s vision; an opportunity we grasp at as critics. But to fall in love with a film is the greatest treasure offered by cinema. It’s the mesmerizing and enchanting feeling that leaves us spellbound and in awe, and is what drives us to continue to watch films. No such negative criticism should be embellished upon Richard Linklater’s coming-of-age drama, for it’s a peerless effort that stands alone. Boyhood follows the story of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) from age five to eighteen, where we live and breathe his experiences from boyhood through adolescence. We see him bicker often with his sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater), and join him right through his relatable teenage episodes that seem as real as the grooves in the palms of your hands. Filmed over twelve years, and lovingly sutured together, Richard Linklater’s vision transforms into reality. It’s almost as if we are offered snippets of Ellar Coltrane’s life …

Martin Scorsese’s Open Letter To His Daughter

In an open letter to his daughter, and in many ways all aspiring filmmakers, Martin Scorsese expressed why he believes that the future of filmmaking is bright. The letter was originally published by Italian magazine L’Espresso. “Dearest Francesca, I’m writing this letter to you about the future. I’m looking at it through the lens of my world. Through the lens of cinema, which has been at the center of that world. For the last few years, I’ve realized that the idea of cinema that I grew up with, that’s there in the movies I’ve been showing you since you were a child, and that was thriving when I started making pictures, is coming to a close. I’m not referring to the films that have already been made. I’m referring to the ones that are to come. I don’t mean to be despairing. I’m not writing these words in a spirit of defeat. On the contrary, I think the future is bright. We always knew that the movies were a business, and that the art of cinema …