All posts tagged: SXSW

‘Short Term 12’ – A Must See Film

Short Term 12 is a devastatingly beautiful examination of vulnerability and hardship. Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, the film stars Brie Larson, John Gallagher Jr., and Kaitlyn Dever. Grace (Larson) is a supervisor at a facility for at-risk teens. She is strong and insistent, yet flexible and nurturing. Her long-time boyfriend and co-worker, Mason (Gallagher Jr.), is equally as compassionate and resilient. Each teen at the facility has their own troubling story and their own ways of coping. Marcus, played by Keith Stanfield, deals with his emotions by writing and rapping, while Jayden (Dever) writes stories and draws. As the film progresses it becomes clear that Grace has many problems of her own, and her way of coping is to help others. Amazingly written and wonderfully acted, Short Term 12 exemplifies how a stellar cast and intriguing story can create something that’s truly one of a kind. I could review Short Term 12 in-depth, and go on and on about why I love it. But instead I ask that you see it for yourself. It’s really that …

REVIEW: “Drinking Buddies”

Drinking Buddies, written and directed by Joe Swanberg, is a romantic comedy starring Olivia Wilde, Jake Johnson, Anna Kendrick, and Ron Livingston. The film examines the romantic lives of Kate (Wilde) and Luke (Johnson), best friends and co-workers who seem to have more chemistry than a ‘Breaking Bad’ episode. The catch? They’re both in serious relationships with other people. And after a double-date weekend trip, things become even more complex when their significant others seem to have a little chemistry of their own. Laughter, tears, and complication ensue. Cleverness aside, I absolutely loved Drinking Buddies. I’ll admit that as a ‘New Girl’/Jake Johnson fan, I may be biased. He’s just too good at being the goofy guy who’s totally cute and secretly in love with a cool girl (that you mentally replace with yourself). But at its core, Drinking Buddies is a spectacularly simple movie about a not-so-simple topic: Love, lust, romance, and relationships. And what’s wonderful about Swanberg’s film is that it doesn’t fall victim to cliches or evolve as a stereo-typical rom-com. The viewer is left dangling, as unsure where …