All posts tagged: Traveling

Looking Back on My Trip to Iceland

Last June I was lucky enough to travel to Iceland and embark on one wild adventure. My boyfriend’s family brought me along on their family vacation (again, I’m unbelievably lucky) and I got to see and do some very cool things. I’ve spent nearly a year writing and then re-writing about my experience in Iceland, but nothing I’ve put together seems to capture the magic of being in a largely untouched place. So instead, I’ll let some of the photos I took throughout my trip speak for themselves. For the record, even the photos don’t do the island justice so you’ll just have to believe me. Long story short, Iceland is fucking cool and if you get the chance, GO THERE! It’s extraterrestrial, beautiful, slow-moving, quiet, remarkably cool, and undoubtedly magical. Flying from Reykjavík to Akureyri Akureyri Airport Whale watching in Húsavík Reynisfjara Beach in Vik Petra’s Stone Collection in Stöðvarfjörður Just outside of Reykjavík Somewhere in Iceland…? Eldhraun lava field Our hotel room in Rangárþing eystra Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon Suðursveit Hornafjörður Skógafoss Gullfoss Dettifos Goðafoss Around Reykjavik …

In & Around Palm Springs

I spent three days this past week in and around Palm Springs with my boyfriend, and below are a few pictures I took during our fun little trip. When I first arrived I wasn’t quite sure why the Palm Desert was (and still is) a go-to Hollywood destination. My realization by the end of our first day was that maybe because I grew up in the desert, desert cities aren’t as much of an escape for me as they are for others. I could see how such a slow, small, pretty town could serve as a reprieve for those who aren’t used to the wondrous charms of the desert. And quickly, I too was charmed by Palm Springs. One of my favorite things about the city is the architecture. I have a love for mid-century modern design, particularly from Southern California, and everywhere I looked there was another groovy building, sign, or piece of furniture. Because the history of Palm Springs is so deeply entrenched in Hollywood – particularly 1920’s through 60’s Hollywood – it …

There’s No Place Like Home

As I captioned the above photo on Instagram, things are always changing in Tucson, but also remaining exactly the same. I spent 24 years of my life living in the same city. I was born there, went to school there, fell in love there, made friends there, lost friends there, had loved ones be born there and die there. And when I moved away I had no idea what it would feel like to come back home. When I’m in Tucson I’m bombarded by familiar smells, sounds, and feelings. The air is different, the stars shine brighter, the birds chirp louder. In the summer there’s the smell of creosote and the sound of cicadas. The fall starts off warm, but a coolness eventually rolls in. The winters are chilly and dark and there’s something wonderful about feeling cold in the desert. In the spring the Texas Rangers bloom with bright purple flowers and the smell of sunscreen fills the air as people flock outside before it gets too hot again. While I wouldn’t trade living in …

Catalina Island: Facts n’ Photos

Before visiting Catalina I knew nothing about the island except for the fact that it’s off the coast of California and (most importantly) that it was the iconic setting for the end of Step Brothers. After spending a weekend on Catalina Island I learned quite a bit and am here to report back with some fun facts and a few photos I took during my short visit. 1. The Catalina Island Wine Mixer is now a real thing, and it’s happening in September! There’s even a Step Brothers themed costume party y’all. 2. The Wrigley family owns Catalina and has since the early 1900’s. 3. The Wrigley family were known for their gum and numerous other business ventures, including as part-owners of the Chicago Cubs. The Cubs even held their spring training on the island from the 1920s until the 1950s. 4. There aren’t many cars on the island. In fact, residents have to spend 30 years on a waiting list before they can even get a Smart Car. Now that’s patience. 5. Instead of cars people use golf carts, and they’re loud, annoying, …

A Weekend in NYC

A few weeks ago I spent a long weekend in New York City, marking my first trip to the big apple ever. On the flight from Reykjavik I started reading How to See the World by Nicholas Mirzoeff – on visual culture and how we see things and are seen – and realized that although I had the experience of observing the New York City of film, television, and advertising, I had never actually seen the city. While I had been dreaming of visiting NYC for years, I showed up almost nervous. After spending time in parts of rural Iceland (the least populated place I have ever been to) I was heading to the most densely inhabited place I had yet to occupy. Iceland has a way of slowing you down and I worried that the extreme change in environment would almost be jarring. But instead of feeling overwhelmed by the hustle and bustle of New York’s streets, it felt good to finally see it myself – not on a screen or billboard. I found New York City to …

Visiting the Huntington

I’ve been meaning to visit The Huntington Library and Gardens in San Marino for over two years, and finally went with my sister recently. Below are photos we took in the various gardens, which span 120 acres and include a Desert Garden, Japanese Garden, and Chinese Garden, among others. The photos below do not do The Huntington justice, so I recommend spending the day there if you’re ever in the Los Angeles area. The Huntington Library was founded in 1919 by Southern California businessman Henry E. Huntington. Huntington had a deep interest in gardens, art, and books – building a massive research library, art collection, and botanical gardens. Only 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles, the Huntington Library is a wonderful place to relax and appreciate nature.

Freedom & Indulgence on the Vegas Strip

Ah, the Las Vegas Strip. You’d think I hate Las Vegas based on my aversion to greed, mass consumption, and gaudiness – but on the contrary, I sort of love it. While the Strip is built on gambling addictions, cheesy simulacrum, and mass amounts of waste (from water fountains to water bottles), there’s a freeness in the four mile stretch of indulgence and exhibitionism that I appreciate and almost relish in. American culture is so go-go-go, earn-earn-earn, that sometimes we collectively lose sight of ourselves. What I believe to be inherently American is this guilt I feel whenever I have the chance to relax. I may have been over worked and exhausted for weeks, but the moment I get to take a break I think of my desire for rest or fun as a flaw. But everyone else is constantly working hard, so why am I tired? Why do I deserve to go do this cool thing? What’s my issue?  Two weeks ago (just one week before the inauguration) I spent two nights in Las Vegas with my boyfriend, celebrating …

Among the Trees at Sequoia National Park

A few weeks ago my parents visited and we took a weekend trip to Sequoia National Park. Out in nature is where I find I can truly relax and rejuvenate, so I thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to escape from the city for a bit with my family. This trip marked my first time seeing the giant sequoia trees of California, and wow are they impressive! Below are a few snapshots that don’t do the magnitude of these sequoia’s justice, but do capture a bit of what I saw on my trip (or more like mere portions of what I saw, because these trees are too big to fit into one photo). Pictured below is General Grant, the world’s 3rd largest tree, found at King’s Canyon National Park, and General Sherman, the world’s largest tree, found at Sequoia National Park. If you’re ever visiting California I absolutely recommend checking out both Sequoia National Park and King’s Canyon National Park. I wish I had spent just a little more time among those massive trees, but I look forward to venturing back some day. Next stops, …

Snapshots from Coronado Island

A few weekends ago I had the chance to visit Coronado Island, just across the water from San Diego, CA. While I intended to get some work done while I was there, it was practically impossible with the near perfect weather and pacific waves calling out to me: just relax…relax…seriously dude, you need to chill… So I ended up getting about 10% of the work done that I needed to, but that’s what happens when you’re near a beach and the type of person who easily puts things off, right? Oh yeah…I have some time on Monday to finish that…I think… I took a day-trip to Coronado a few years ago, but this was the first time I really had the opportunity to check the place out. My boyfriend’s family was in town and kind enough to invite us down, so we explored the island for a few days with them. We ate breakfast at Clayton’s Coffee Shop, a 50’s diner that genuinely feels like a 50’s diner, walked along Dog Beach, and spent plenty of time strolling around the glorious Hotel del Coronado, …

6 Great Road Trip Films

When I think of summer, one of the first things that comes to mind is road trips. Exploration, freedom, discovery…rediscovery. Because it’s summer and I’ve been on a few trips recently myself, I decided it would be fun to do a post sharing six road trip films that I consider to be personal favorites. Thematically, it seems that the road trip genre is so wonderful because it expands the ways in which characters can be explored. On the road, we’re vulnerable. Though the journey of a road trip film may not start with the intent of personal exploration, what follows is nearly always life changing. The characters grow; they learn more about themselves and their compatriots, and often even more about the society they live in. The six films I’ve selected to post a short blurb about all share a few similarities. Most evident is the fact that all of the characters featured in these films make discoveries and decisions that are irreversible; their lives change on the road, for better or for worse. Discovery and change are the two clearest motifs that characterize these road trip films, …