All posts tagged: Twitter

Why I Can’t Stand Facebook

Facebook is a self-esteem killer – studies even prove it. More so than Twitter or Instagram, Facebook is designed so you can constantly show off your amazing life (Look at my awesome pictures from my trip to Turks and Caicos. See how many friends I have! Did you notice how many likes I got for that status update about my new beach towel?). But what if your life isn’t that amazing? Although many people use Facebook just to keep in touch with friends and family they don’t see very often, for some consistent users it’s often difficult not to let these things get to you. Maybe your life doesn’t look so cool on Facebook. Maybe that bothers you. I started using the site during my sophomore or junior year of high school (somewhere between 06′-08′). After ditching Myspace – with its ultra annoying “Top 8” – it was nice to have some sort of social media in my life again. Although in social terms high school was my least fulfilling time, Facebook really had no affect on my self-esteem. I …

Check it Out: Bitch Media

Although the newspaper and magazine industries have taken a hit in recent years, I still find that there is nothing more enjoyable than waking up and reading something palpable with a hot coffee by my side. Magazines have a certain feel to them; their pages are cool and crisp, with easy to grab edges that turn with a swooshing sound that reminds me of my adolescence. When I am reading a magazine I feel as though I’m taking part in something that may no longer exist during the third act of my life. That is a sentiment that I hope is extraordinarily false. Magazines have a very specific formula that allow them to be appealing to the general masses and even more scholarly sorts. They are usually short enough that they can be consumed quickly, but often include long articles that may take time to fully digest. Sometimes, when a writer has created something that is truly an amazing experience to take in, I must read it twice. To me, that’s journalism at it’s finest. It’s entertaining, educational, and has a voice associated with the …

The Bechdel Test

The Bechdel Test (also known as the Bechdel-Wallace test) was created by Allison Bechdel and Liz Wallace as a way to evaluate the presence of women in Hollywood films, and is featured in Bechdel’s 1985 comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For. The test has three requirements for a film to pass: (1) It has to have at least two named women in it (2) who talk to each other (3) about something besides a man. At first that sounds pretty simple; the act of two women talking to each other about something other than a man certainly reflects reality. But the truth is, substantially more films fail the Bechdel test than pass it – and that needs to change. Now, I’m not saying you should avoid films that don’t pass the Bechdel test. Very few Oscar nominated films did, including my favorite of the year, 12 Years a Slave (which  is disputed whether or not it passes). But it is important for movie goers (and creators) to be aware that many films that strive to be genuine and real …

My Thesis Film

My senior year of college I set out to make a thesis film that reflected my sensibilities and personal aesthetic. Fruition is an experimental short film in which a young woman experiences and perceives abrupt changes in her existence. It’s about the journey of life, which is particularly turbulent between adolescence and adulthood. Fruition screened at I Dream in Widescreen on May 11, 2013 at The Fox Theatre in downtown Tucson, AZ. At the screening it received honorable mention for cinematography, which was done artfully by Santiago Bahti. It has been almost a year since I completed my thesis project and it still boggles my mind just how much work goes into a six minute short film. In retrospect there is so much (I repeat, so much) I would change about my thesis short – but isn’t that the point of school? This project was a lesson (one of many I hope) and I look forward to learning and developing more as I grow into my own style. Heck, I’m even still trying to figure out what I want to spend the rest of my life doing! All I know is, I …

Moments of Symmetry – “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

If “auteur” were defined on Urban Dictionary.com, it would include a picture of Wes Anderson and stills from some of his uniquely well-crafted films. However, it has not been defined, so no such definition exists. Maybe when I’m bored I’ll add it.  Anyhoo, back to Wes Anderson//auteur theory… In recent years (with films such as The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox) Wes Anderson’s visual aesthetic has seem to become even more meticulous and well defined. In a short video entitled Mise En Scène & The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson, Anderson discusses his visual style in various interviews (including one with Terry Gross), mentioning his interest in theater as a recurring influence (video credit: Way Too Indie).   After watching The Grand Budapest Hotel (which for the record, I absolutely loved) one aesthetic tendency became very clear to me – even more so than in any Wes Anderson film I had seen before: s y m m e t r y. Nearly ever shot is painstakingly symmetrical, which lends itself to creating the sort of whimsical world within reality that Wes Anderson is known for. The …

Best of “Between Two Ferns” With Zach Galifianakis

Between Two Ferns has been on my radar for awhile because I love Zach Galifianakis and nearly anything on Funny or Die, but now it’s on the entire country’s radar. After President Barack Obama’s visit to the show, the internet was buzzing not only about the Affordable Care Act, but also about Galifianakis’ hilarious faux access-television web series. While many responded positively to Obama’s surprise interview, there was a lot of backlash from conservative groups and individuals that thought it was undignified. My thought? I appreciate having a president who can relate to American youth and is humble (and funny) enough to do something so out of the ordinary. The purpose of the interview was to reach out to young people and encourage them to take advantage of the Affordable Care Act before the enrollment period ends this month. And Obama was successful; funnyordie.com drove substantial amounts of traffic to heathcare.gov. But enough about politics! I think every episode I’ve ever seen of Between Two Ferns is funny, but here are just a few of …

‘Dallas Buyers Club’ – Matthew McConaughey & Jared Leto Deliver Spectacular Performances

Dallas Buyers Club, written by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack and directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, is based on the true story of Ron Woodroof, a Texan who begins smuggling prescription drugs into the US when he is diagnosed with HIV and finds that the medication he is receiving is not helping. The film stars Matthew McConaughey as Woodroof, Jared Leto as his saucy business partner Rayon, and Jennifer Garner Dr. Eve Saks, his compassionate doctor. It’s 1985. Ron Woodroof is an electrician and bull rider in Dallas, TX. He’s a homophobe, a drug addict, and a man who’s eager to sleep with any woman who’s willing. After living recklessly for quite some time, Woodroof is diagnosed with HIV and told he only has 30 days to live. Soon he becomes aware of his day to day existence – transforming his intense energy into something positive and powerful. When he discovers that AZT, the first HIV medication approved by the FDA, is actually hurting his body rather than helping, Ron establishes the Dallas Buyers Club, selling memberships in …

Endearing & Entertaining Oscar Acceptance Speeches

With Academy Award nomination announcements less than two months away, and Oscar movie season in full swing, I thought it would be timely to revisit some of the most endearing and entertaining acceptance speeches:   1. Cuba Gooding Jr. (Best Supporting Actor, Jerry Maguire)   2. Sandra Bullock (Best Actress, The Blind Side) (Starts at 8:50)   3. Adrien Brody (Best Actor, The Pianist)    4. Matt Damon & Ben Affleck (Best Original Screenplay, Good Will Hunting)   5. Kate Winslet (Best Actress, The Reader) (Starts at 6:35)   6. John Wayne (Best Actor, True Grit) (Starts at 1:00)   7. Jennifer Hudson (Best Supporting Actress, Dreamgirls) (Starts at 1:35)   8. Three 6 Mafia (Best Original Song, Hustle & Flow) (Starts at 1:00)   9. Dustin Lance Black (Best Original Screenplay, Milk)   10. Halle Berry (Best Actress, Monster’s Ball)   11. Michael Caine (Best Supporting Actor, The Cider House Rules) (Starts at 2:40)   12. Steven Soderbergh (Best Director, Traffic) (Starts at 1:00)   13. Charlize Theron (Best Actress, Monster) (Starts at 1:50)   14.  Robin Williams (Best Supporting Actor, Good Will Hunting) (Starts at 1:25)   …

Shabazz Palaces – ‘Black Up’

Shabazz Palaces – “Black Up,” is the third ‘video of the day’ post featuring Kahlil Joseph’s work. Joseph is a spectacularly talented director whose visual style I’d describe as truly mesmerizing. His ability to capture the essence of people and spaces is nothing short of brilliant, and I greatly admire his work. “‘Black Up’ is a short film that portrays a fever dream induced by the music of Shabazz Palaces. The film features songs from Shabazz Palaces’ album Black Up on Sub Pop Records, as well as various pieces of unreleased material.”

Splitscreen: A Love Story

I discovered Splitscreen: A Love Story about two years ago and never forgot it. Charming, simple, and creative, it’s a visual journey of love and exploration in which two people from separate sides of the globe meet. It was filmed entirely on the Nokia N8 cell phone and won the 2011 Nokia Shorts competition.