All posts tagged: Wes Anderson

A Few of My Favorite Films From 2014

There are soooooo many films from 2014 that I desperately want to see, but haven’t had the chance to. Some of those films include Selma, Whiplash, Goodbye to Language, Inherent Vice, and Citizenfour – among countless others. I decided against doing a Top 10 list this year because there is no way that my picks will be representative of the work that premiered in 2014. Instead, I’ll share a list of movies I liked and discuss my #1 film of the year. Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer) Chef (Jon Favreau) Guardians of the Galaxy (James Gunn) Top Five (Chris Rock) Interstellar (Christopher Nolan) Happy Christmas (Joe Swanberg) The One I Love (Charlie McDowell) Life Itself (Steve James) Nightcrawler (Dan Gilroy) The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson) They Came Together (David Wain) Wild (Jean-Marc Vallée) Now on to my absolute favorite film of the year,  Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu. It’s difficult for me to put into words exactly why I love Birdman as much as I do. It’s magical – magnetic – deep – dark – wild – wonderful, and everything in between. I sat in the theater and experienced an entire spectrum of emotions, …

Moments of Symmetry – “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

If “auteur” were defined on Urban Dictionary.com, it would include a picture of Wes Anderson and stills from some of his uniquely well-crafted films. However, it has not been defined, so no such definition exists. Maybe when I’m bored I’ll add it.  Anyhoo, back to Wes Anderson//auteur theory… In recent years (with films such as The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox) Wes Anderson’s visual aesthetic has seem to become even more meticulous and well defined. In a short video entitled Mise En Scène & The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson, Anderson discusses his visual style in various interviews (including one with Terry Gross), mentioning his interest in theater as a recurring influence (video credit: Way Too Indie).   After watching The Grand Budapest Hotel (which for the record, I absolutely loved) one aesthetic tendency became very clear to me – even more so than in any Wes Anderson film I had seen before: s y m m e t r y. Nearly ever shot is painstakingly symmetrical, which lends itself to creating the sort of whimsical world within reality that Wes Anderson is known for. The …

Martin Scorsese’s Open Letter To His Daughter

In an open letter to his daughter, and in many ways all aspiring filmmakers, Martin Scorsese expressed why he believes that the future of filmmaking is bright. The letter was originally published by Italian magazine L’Espresso. “Dearest Francesca, I’m writing this letter to you about the future. I’m looking at it through the lens of my world. Through the lens of cinema, which has been at the center of that world. For the last few years, I’ve realized that the idea of cinema that I grew up with, that’s there in the movies I’ve been showing you since you were a child, and that was thriving when I started making pictures, is coming to a close. I’m not referring to the films that have already been made. I’m referring to the ones that are to come. I don’t mean to be despairing. I’m not writing these words in a spirit of defeat. On the contrary, I think the future is bright. We always knew that the movies were a business, and that the art of cinema …