All posts tagged: Wordpress

The 7 Blogging Rules I’m Always Breaking

Lately I’ve been thinking about all of the sort of universal blogging and social media marketing rules that I should be following, but don’t. The truth is, I break most of these rules despite knowing that they would surely improve my blog. But is Catch-all successful already? Well that depends on how you define success… In almost every way you look at it, my blog isn’t successful. I’ve been working on it for years and it hasn’t taken off yet and may never. But that’s okay, because I like writing and blogging, and for that reason I consider it a triumph in my own terms. Catch-all is a place where I can share my thoughts and photos, and people will either read what I write and engage – or they won’t. And that’s okay. Though I’m still trying to figure out what the identity of this blog truly is and how to best support it, I’m also just enjoying the journey and not giving it much thought. But after working on this list it became clear that if I do ever want …

The Benefits of Blogging

I’ve been blogging for a few years now and it’s something I feel passionately about and love doing. Here are just a few of the benefits I’ve discovered in starting and sustaining Catch-all: It’s a creative outlet When your work life is less than creatively fulfilling, blogging provides an opportunity to express yourself. I’m personally of the school of thought that we’re all creative people – some of us just know how to access our imagination better than others. I also believe that self-expression is hugely beneficial for anyone’s work, whether you’re an accountant, secretary, painter, or writer. Blogging improves your writing and helps you find your voice When you write a lot, your writing will naturally improve. Blogging is far more informal than most styles of writing, but I’ve found that posting on Catch-all has benefited my academic work as well. And after three years of working on this blog, I think I’ve finally become more comfortable with my voice as a writer, which of course is always evolving. Keeping up with my goal of posting weekly also requires that I’m constantly thinking of new ideas, jotting them …

Crowdfunding Tips for Filmmakers

For many, crowdfunding is an excellent way to fundraise for a short film or web series. For those who are trying it out for the first time, here are just a few tips to make your experience more enjoyable and successful. 1. Determine what site you want to fundraise on. I recommend Indiegogo, but there are other options such as Seed&Spark or Kickstarter. In general, I don’t recommend using Kickstarter because if you don’t reach your goal, you don’t get funded. 2. Have a realistic budget in mind. If you’re asking for too much you may scare away potential donors or not reach your goal. Ask for too little, and extra expenses will be coming out of your pocket instead. 3. Develop a detailed outline of your expenses and share it with your campaign. 4. Determine how long you want your campaign to last. At the very least, make sure you have a month to fund raise. If you are asking for a significant amount of money ($10,000+) add more time to your campaign. No matter what the goal is, I believe 15 weeks should be the maximum amount of time …

Blogging: The Basics

1. Although you can blog about absolutely anything in the world, make sure you center your content around a topic or topics that you’re passionate about. Food, fashion, travel, music, books, films, poetry, photography, arts and crafts, interior design, politics, gaming, gardening, makeup, parenting – the options are endless. 2. Be yourself. If you’re starting your own blog, you probably have a few bloggers that you look up to. Be sure not to emulate their style – do your own thing. 3. Though the top-tier bloggers (the 1%) make lucrative amounts of money, do not get into blogging for the cash. The only reason those bloggers are so successful is because they spent years developing their sites before making a significant income. You may never make money from your blog and you have to be okay with that. 4. Seek out bloggers who enjoy the same types of things you do. Bloggers are often open and welcoming people, making for an inclusive online community. Make an effort to engage with others and you’ll be sure to grow as a writer and content creator. 5. …

Growing Old & Growing Up

“Most people don’t grow up. Most people age. They find parking spaces, honor their credit cards, get married, have children and call that maturity. What that is, is aging.” – Maya Angelou   “You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.” – George Bernard Shaw   “Love does not begin and end the way we seem to think it does. Love is a battle, love is war; love is growing up.”- James Baldwin   “Everyone thinks you make mistakes when you’re young. But I don’t think we make any fewer mistakes when we’re grown up.” – Jodi Picoult   “The trick is growing up without growing old. “- Casey Stengel   “I am convinced that most people do not grow up…We may marry and dare to have children and call that growing up. I think what we do is mostly grow old. We carry accumulation of years in our bodies, and on our faces, but generally our real selves, the real children inside, are innocent and shy as magnolias.” – Maya Angelou   “Parents …

My Thesis Film

My senior year of college I set out to make a thesis film that reflected my sensibilities and personal aesthetic. Fruition is an experimental short film in which a young woman experiences and perceives abrupt changes in her existence. It’s about the journey of life, which is particularly turbulent between adolescence and adulthood. Fruition screened at I Dream in Widescreen on May 11, 2013 at The Fox Theatre in downtown Tucson, AZ. At the screening it received honorable mention for cinematography, which was done artfully by Santiago Bahti. It has been almost a year since I completed my thesis project and it still boggles my mind just how much work goes into a six minute short film. In retrospect there is so much (I repeat, so much) I would change about my thesis short – but isn’t that the point of school? This project was a lesson (one of many I hope) and I look forward to learning and developing more as I grow into my own style. Heck, I’m even still trying to figure out what I want to spend the rest of my life doing! All I know is, I …

Moments of Symmetry – “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

If “auteur” were defined on Urban Dictionary.com, it would include a picture of Wes Anderson and stills from some of his uniquely well-crafted films. However, it has not been defined, so no such definition exists. Maybe when I’m bored I’ll add it.  Anyhoo, back to Wes Anderson//auteur theory… In recent years (with films such as The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox) Wes Anderson’s visual aesthetic has seem to become even more meticulous and well defined. In a short video entitled Mise En Scène & The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson, Anderson discusses his visual style in various interviews (including one with Terry Gross), mentioning his interest in theater as a recurring influence (video credit: Way Too Indie).   After watching The Grand Budapest Hotel (which for the record, I absolutely loved) one aesthetic tendency became very clear to me – even more so than in any Wes Anderson film I had seen before: s y m m e t r y. Nearly ever shot is painstakingly symmetrical, which lends itself to creating the sort of whimsical world within reality that Wes Anderson is known for. The …